Census

 May 26th 2017 - Written by: Suzan Reagan

Census Bureau Releases City, Town & Village Population Estimates for 2016

On May 25, 2017 the US Census Bureau released the 2016 population estimates for 162 cities, towns and villages across New Mexico. Over the last year New Mexico experienced minimal population growth reaching a total population of 2,081,015. This represents an increase of just 687 people or less than 1/10th of a percent since 2015.  However, local communities did see bigger gains or losses in population. The top five areas which had the greatest growth (in percentage terms) from 2015 to 2016 are Bernalillo town (4.3%), Sunland Park city (3.5%), Rio Rancho city (2.2%), Reserve village (1.8%) and Alamogordo city (1.6%). The top 5 area’s in 2016 with the greatest population growth since 2010 were Sunland Park city (15.6%), Hobbs city (11.9%), Carlsbad city (10.4%), Bernalillo town (10.3%), and Rio Rancho city (9.2%). The five areas with the largest rate of decline from 2015 to 2016 include Aztec city (-3.1%), Eunice city… View Full Post

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  Census, Population
  

 April 6th 2017 - Written by: Suzan Reagan

Census Population Estimate Release March 2017

A look at New Mexico Trends – In recent years, New Mexico has seen a change in its population growth trends. As of July 1, 2010, the New Mexico population estimate was 2,064,756.1 By 2013, the state population plateaued at 2,085,193 before declining to 2,080,328 in 2015. However, population in 2016 increased slightly to 2,081,015, resulting in a 0.03 percent increase over 2015 and a 0.79 percent increase over 2010. To put the slow rates of growth over the last six years in context, for the prior decade, 2000 through 2010, the population in New Mexico grew 13.43 percent.2 Since 2010, New Mexico counties in New Mexico had mixed results with regard to population growth. Only three counties had growth above 5 percent; those counties included: Eddy (6.9%), Lea (7.9%) and Sandoval (7.3%). Nine additional nine counties experienced positive growth since 2010.  Meanwhile, of New Mexico’s 33 counties, 21 had… View Full Post

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 December 12th 2016 - Written by: Suzan Reagan

Very Rural Areas of New Mexico

Select Social and Economic Characteristics of New Mexico Rural Counties The US Census Bureau has identified six New Mexico counties (Catron, De Baca, Harding, Hidalgo, Mora, and Union) as completely rural. Each of these rural counties has their own unique social and economic characteristics. According to the Census Bureau’s 2015 American Communities Survey (ACS) 5 year estimates, these counties have an older population and a lower median household income compared to New Mexico. The New Mexico population density is about 17.0 people per square mile according to the 2015 ACS 5 year estimates. The completely rural counties comprise less than 1 percent of the New Mexico population and comprise about 17 percent of the New Mexico land area for a combined population density of about 0.9 people per square mile. In completely rural counties the population density ranged from a low of 0.3 in Harding County to a high of… View Full Post

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 December 9th 2016 - Written by: Suzan Reagan

How Rural is New Mexico?

Nationally urban populations have increased while rural populations have declined. The US Census Bureau estimated that the 1910 rural populations were at 54.4 percent of the total US population while in 2010 they had declined to 19.3 percent. In New Mexico the 1910 Decennial Census rural population was estimated at 85.8 percent and for 2010 the rural population had declined to 22.6 percent. New Mexico has followed the national trend but continues to have a higher percent of rural areas compared to the national. Of New Mexico’s 33 counties the Census Bureau has identified six as completely rural and an additional six as mostly rural. The most rural counties Catron, De Baca, Harding, Hidalgo, Mora, and Union had no urban population for the 2010 Census coming in at 100 percent rural. Torrance County had 98.8 percent rural population (see table below). The remaining 21 counties are considered urban. Even counties such as… View Full Post

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 May 20th 2016 - Written by: Suzan Reagan

Current Trends in NM Healthcare Insurance Coverage

In recent years, health insurance coverage has received a lot of attention. Since the implementation of the Affordable Health Care Act and the New Mexico Medicare Expansion there certainly have been many questions on the measurement of the impacts of these programs. The Census Bureau Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE) program data release of May 12, 2016 provides some indication of the increase coverage for health insurance in New Mexico. For 2014 the New Mexico uninsured rate was 17.1 percent for those under 65 years old. This represents a decrease of 4.8 percent from 21.9 percent in 2013. The New Mexico demographic details for those who are under 65 years of age for 2014 shows that Non-Hispanic White had a 10.6 percent uninsured rate which was a decrease of 3.2 percent from 2013. In New Mexico for Non-Hispanic Black the 2014 uninsured was 15.7 percent a decrease of 4.9… View Full Post

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  Census, Health Care
  

 April 11th 2016 - Written by: Michael O'Donnell

The Labor Force & Demographic Shifts

In my last two blog posts, I discussed trends in labor force participation (here) and reasons why so many people are out of the labor force (here). As I noted in my most recent post, shifting demographic trends have changed the landscape of the labor force over the last decade and are likely to continue into the future – this is especially true of the oldest age cohorts. In particular, those cohorts have managed to simultaneously increase their rates of labor force participation while at the same time adding the largest number of people not in the labor force. The reason for this seeming incongruity is that population growth for this group is rapid. The population pyramid below, which is provided by the US Census Bureau, shows how the dynamics of the US population have changed through time. The pyramid, which allows you to scroll through years from 2000 to… View Full Post

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 March 16th 2016 - Written by: Michael O'Donnell

Why Are So Many People Out of the Labor Force?

As I discussed in my last blog post (here), labor force participation rates, and trends in the rates, vary greatly by age cohort. While the overall rate has generally fallen for the past 10 years, individuals in the 24 and younger age cohort have been particularly affected. Meanwhile, the rate for those aged 55 or older has generally gone in the opposite direction over the same period and hit all-time highs after the Great Recession. Individuals within the prime working age cohort of 25-54 fall somewhere between the two extremes; however, the series trend has been downward after the great recession. What explains the trends? The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), using the Current Population Survey (CPS) and its Annual Social and Economic Supplement, investigated this very question (which can be found here). In that report, the BLS compared responses to surveys from 2004 and 2014. Individuals were asked to… View Full Post

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 March 7th 2016 - Written by: Suzan Reagan

Youth have higher unemployment rates – Local area demographic data by employment status

Youth tend to have a much higher unemployment rate then other age groups. In New Mexico, the overall unemployment rate was 9.6 percent, but from the Census Bureau’s 2014 American Community Survey (ACS), 5 year estimates for 16 to 19 years old was 39.3 percent and 20 to 24 years old was 15.7 percent. In the United States, youth are also seen to have higher unemployment rates than other age groups with 16 to 19 years old at 27.1 percent and 20 to 24 years old at 15.3 percent. New Mexico’s youth aged 16 to 19 years at a 39.3 percent annual unemployment rate for 2014 from ACS is significantly higher than the the 27.1 percent seen nationally. The numbers show that many youths both in New Mexico and across the nation have a difficult time obtaining employment. Source: US Census Bureau American Community Survey, Table S2301 EMPLOYMENT STATUS for New… View Full Post

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  ACS, Census, Employment
  

 February 24th 2016 - Written by: Suzan Reagan

Preparing for the 2020 Census is already underway

  Right now the Census Bureau is making important decisions about the next decennial census. It might seem like April 1, 2020 is a long way away from now, but the Bureau published its operational plan back in October last year. The director John Thompson noted in his blog on February, 5, 2016  that this year there will be 62 key decisions made that will effect how the 2020 Census will be carried out. There are also two census advisory committees which have been active in providing recommendations for improvements. While the operational plan outlines in extensive detail lots of activities, there are a few key items that New Mexicans should be aware of. These are programs, which will be requesting information from the states that leading up to the decennial census, will affect how well the data are collected at that time. Boundary and Annexation Survey (BAS) This program is… View Full Post

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  Census
  

UNM Bureau of Business and Economic Research • Onate Hall at The University of New Mexico
303 Girard Blvd. NE, Suite 116; Albuquerque, NM 87106 • 505.277.2216 Main • 505.277.6626 Data Bank