Poverty

 December 12th 2016 - Written by: Suzan Reagan

Very Rural Areas of New Mexico

Select Social and Economic Characteristics of New Mexico Rural Counties The US Census Bureau has identified six New Mexico counties (Catron, De Baca, Harding, Hidalgo, Mora, and Union) as completely rural. Each of these rural counties has their own unique social and economic characteristics. According to the Census Bureau’s 2015 American Communities Survey (ACS) 5 year estimates, these counties have an older population and a lower median household income compared to New Mexico. The New Mexico population density is about 17.0 people per square mile according to the 2015 ACS 5 year estimates. The completely rural counties comprise less than 1 percent of the New Mexico population and comprise about 17 percent of the New Mexico land area for a combined population density of about 0.9 people per square mile. In completely rural counties the population density ranged from a low of 0.3 in Harding County to a high of… View Full Post

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 March 11th 2016 - Written by: Raphael Pacheco

Less considered ART impact on low income households

In the past few months Albuquerque residents might have noticed large banners and signs adorning the facades of businesses on Central Avenue. The “No Albuquerque Rapid Transit” message echoed by dozens of establishments is hard to miss along the famous Route 66. Some business owners along Central and other opposition groups, like Save Route 66 Central, claim that the Albuquerque Rapid Transit (ART) as currently proposed will not provide faster ride times for passengers, will decrease business accessibility, and will have adverse impacts on current parking, bicycle lanes, and mature trees (http://savert66.org/infographics/). On the other hand, many supporters of the $119 million improved method of transportation, like Albuquerque Mayor Richard Berry, believe the investment will spur development in the region, providing economic growth and opportunity to many who travel, live, or shop along the busy historic road. But regardless of the ART’s impact on businesses, commuting problems highlight a severe problem… View Full Post

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UNM Bureau of Business and Economic Research • Onate Hall at The University of New Mexico
303 Girard Blvd. NE, Suite 116; Albuquerque, NM 87106 • 505.277.2216 Main • 505.277.6626 Data Bank