Publications

Arts and Culture

Building on the Past, Facing the Future: Renewing the Creative Economy of New Mexico
August 1, 2014
The arts and cultural industries are among the main drivers of New Mexico’s economy. Arts and culture in New Mexico enjoy a national reputation far beyond the state’s size or economic standing. With the proper level of support and evolution, the arts and cultural industries could be leveraged to help power the New Mexico economy as it emerges from the economic recession. To appreciate the importance of arts and culture to New Mexico’s economy, consider that these industries are the primary source of employment for 43,031 New Mexicans –roughly equal to the state’s construction industry and 50% larger than the manufacturing industry. The arts and cultural industries account for about 1 of every 18 jobs in the state (5.5%). These industries pay $1.37 billion in wages and salaries, roughly equal to the total paid by the state’s mining industry, and more than the total paid by hotels and restaurants. These figures are based on a narrow definition of the A&C industries. If we include persons employed cultural tourism, arts and cultural education and industries linked to the unique culture and heritage of the state (e.g. crafts, salsa, and adobe), the arts and cultural industries employ 76,780 persons - equal to about one in ten jobs (9.8%) in the state. That is more than the construction and manufacturing industries combined. Arts and cultural industries generate $137.1 million in revenues for state and local governments in New Mexico. Approximately two-thirds of the total is received by the state government as gross receipts taxes, income taxes paid by cultural workers, federal transfers and various fees and private grants. The total cost of cultural services to public agencies in New Mexico is $168.0 million. Most of these costs are borne by local (and especially municipal) governments, with the largest share of the funds allocated to libraries as well as museums and cultural services and events. These figures do not include revenues or spending on public education.
PDF Version [1.9 MB]

Options for Funding Local Library Operations (Including Collections) in New Mexico
April 1, 2010
This is a study of financing options for the operations of local libraries in New Mexico, whether these libraries are run by municipalities, counties, as a cooperative city-county effort, by non-profit organizations, by Native American tribes or by regional authorities as yet to be constituted. Our concern has been with the 93 local libraries that currently comprise the State Library system. We have not considered libraries in public schools, nor those in our colleges and universities, although surely these are important resources to local communities and not just to those who are fortunate enough to be students, staff or teachers/faculty at these institutions. The primary concern is with funding for library operations, by which we understand on-going needs: salaries and benefits for library staff, operations and maintenance of library facilities, utilities and other expenses associated with operations, and, critically, books and media. This is not to deny the importance of adequate facilities, but wonderful facilities are of little worth unless one can keep the doors open, a staff paid and unless one has product, most notably books and media, but also cultural and other programming to draw patrons of all ages. (Authors: Lee Reynis, Molly Bleecker, Sean Petranovich)
PDF Version [711.4 K]

The Economic Importance of the Arts & Cultural Industries in Albuquerque and Bernalillo County
August 1, 2007
The Arts and Cultural Industries in Albuquerque and Bernalillo County are mainstays of the regional economy. Arts and cultural industries generate $1.2 billion in revenues, $413 million in wages, and 19,500 jobs, totaling 6% of all employment in the County. Half of this activity is funded by dollars from outside the region, generating economic growth and opportunity.
PDF Version [1.8 MB]

The Economic Importance of the Arts and Cultural Industries in ABQ and Bernalillo Cty Summary
August 1, 2007
The Arts and Cultural Industries in Albuquerque and Bernalillo County are mainstays of the regional economy Arts and cultural industries g enerate $1.2 billion in revenues, $413 million in wages, and 19,500 jobs, totaling 6% of all employment in the County Half of this activity is funded by dollars from outside the region, generating economic growth and opportunity. This is a 24 page summary on the larger report.
PDF Version [1.0 MB]

The Economic Importance of the Arts and Cultural Industries in ABQ and Bernalillo Cty Brochure
August 1, 2007
The Arts and Cultural Industries in Albuquerque and Bernalillo County are mainstays of the regional economy Arts and cultural industries g enerate $1.2 billion in revenues, $413 million in wages, and 19,500 jobs, totaling 6% of all employment in the County Half of this activity is funded by dollars from outside the region, generating economic growth and opportunity. This is the Quick Look Brochure.
PDF Version [282.7 K]

Santa Fe Design Week: A Pilot Study
January 1, 2007
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico was contracted by the City of Santa Fe Economic Development Division to conduct a baseline economic impact and program evaluation of Santa Fe Design Week (SFDW). SFDW is a week-long symposium bringing together design professionals from areas such as graphic design, furniture design, architecture, fashion design and sustainable energy and water design from Santa Fe (SF) and around the world. The event is a collection of presentations, demonstrations, tours and workshops aimed at educating professionals and the general public of the newest innovations in the design industries. In the long term, the goal of SFDW is to promote various design industries in a way that helps expand markets and create local career opportunities in these fields.
PDF Version [188.1 K]

The Economic Importance of the Arts & Cultural Industries in Santa Fe Cty (Executive Summary)
November 1, 2004
In 2002, Santa Fe’s arts & cultural industries (A&CI) and cultural tourism generated over $1 billion in receipts, employed 12,567 workers (17.5% of total employment in Santa Fe county), and paid $231.5 million in wages and salaries. Just over one-half of employment and wages are generated by industries that are either directly engaged in the creation, presentation or preservation of art and/or cultural activities, or indirectly engaged with cultural content but not themselves “source activities”. The balance is generated by the tourism industry to the extent that tourism is associated with an interest in Santa Fe’s art, cultural and historical attractions.
PDF Version [181.3 K]

The Economic Importance of the Arts & Cultural Industries in Santa Fe County - Quant Impacts
November 1, 2004
Part 1 of this research project quantified the contribution of Arts and cultural industries (A&CIs), including cultural tourism, to Santa Fe's economy. The results, based on 2002 data, were impressive: A&CIs are responsible for nearly 4 of every 10 dollars that flow into Santa Fe county; one out of every 6 workers in the county are directly or indirectly employed by the A&CIs, including cultural tourism; Santa Fe's A&CIs rank as one of the top industries in New Mexico, comparable to Intel and UNM in terms of direct, indirect and induced employment and wages; public revenues far exceed expenditures for arts and culture – a nearly 400% return for City and 40% return for State government expenditures. The
PDF Version [607.0 K]

The Economic Importance of the Arts & Cultural Industries in Santa Fe Cty - Quant Analysis
November 1, 2004
The purpose of Part 2 of this project is to look behind these numbers and examine the social and economic dynamics that link arts and culture to other sectors of the community of Santa Fe. The premise of this work is that a better understanding of underlying dynamics will enable industry leaders and the community to leverage the assets of the arts & culture sector to create a broader pattern of economic growth and increase benefits to the city’s population. To investigate these dynamics BBER conducted nearly 100 in-depth interviews with people representing various sectors of the community; analyzed demographic and historical economic data; and reviewed academic and planning literature on issues relevant to experiences and challenges faced by Santa Fe.
PDF Version [470.0 K]

UNM Bureau of Business and Economic Research • Onate Hall at The University of New Mexico
303 Girard Blvd. NE, Suite 116; Albuquerque, NM 87106 • 505.277.2216 Main • 505.277.6626 Data Bank