Publications by Category

Arts and Culture

Building on the Past, Facing the Future: Renewing the Creative Economy of New Mexico
August 1, 2014
The arts and cultural industries are among the main drivers of New Mexico’s economy. Arts and culture in New Mexico enjoy a national reputation far beyond the state’s size or economic standing. With the proper level of support and evolution, the arts and cultural industries could be leveraged to help power the New Mexico economy as it emerges from the economic recession. To appreciate the importance of arts and culture to New Mexico’s economy, consider that these industries are the primary source of employment for 43,031 New Mexicans –roughly equal to the state’s construction industry and 50% larger than the manufacturing industry. The arts and cultural industries account for about 1 of every 18 jobs in the state (5.5%). These industries pay $1.37 billion in wages and salaries, roughly equal to the total paid by the state’s mining industry, and more than the total paid by hotels and restaurants. These figures are based on a narrow definition of the A&C industries. If we include persons employed cultural tourism, arts and cultural education and industries linked to the unique culture and heritage of the state (e.g. crafts, salsa, and adobe), the arts and cultural industries employ 76,780 persons - equal to about one in ten jobs (9.8%) in the state. That is more than the construction and manufacturing industries combined. Arts and cultural industries generate $137.1 million in revenues for state and local governments in New Mexico. Approximately two-thirds of the total is received by the state government as gross receipts taxes, income taxes paid by cultural workers, federal transfers and various fees and private grants. The total cost of cultural services to public agencies in New Mexico is $168.0 million. Most of these costs are borne by local (and especially municipal) governments, with the largest share of the funds allocated to libraries as well as museums and cultural services and events. These figures do not include revenues or spending on public education.
PDF Version [1.9 MB]

Options for Funding Local Library Operations (Including Collections) in New Mexico
April 1, 2010
This is a study of financing options for the operations of local libraries in New Mexico, whether these libraries are run by municipalities, counties, as a cooperative city-county effort, by non-profit organizations, by Native American tribes or by regional authorities as yet to be constituted. Our concern has been with the 93 local libraries that currently comprise the State Library system. We have not considered libraries in public schools, nor those in our colleges and universities, although surely these are important resources to local communities and not just to those who are fortunate enough to be students, staff or teachers/faculty at these institutions. The primary concern is with funding for library operations, by which we understand on-going needs: salaries and benefits for library staff, operations and maintenance of library facilities, utilities and other expenses associated with operations, and, critically, books and media. This is not to deny the importance of adequate facilities, but wonderful facilities are of little worth unless one can keep the doors open, a staff paid and unless one has product, most notably books and media, but also cultural and other programming to draw patrons of all ages. (Authors: Lee Reynis, Molly Bleecker, Sean Petranovich)
PDF Version [711.4 K]

The Economic Importance of the Arts & Cultural Industries in Albuquerque and Bernalillo County
August 1, 2007
The Arts and Cultural Industries in Albuquerque and Bernalillo County are mainstays of the regional economy. Arts and cultural industries generate $1.2 billion in revenues, $413 million in wages, and 19,500 jobs, totaling 6% of all employment in the County. Half of this activity is funded by dollars from outside the region, generating economic growth and opportunity.
PDF Version [1.8 MB]

The Economic Importance of the Arts and Cultural Industries in ABQ and Bernalillo Cty Summary
August 1, 2007
The Arts and Cultural Industries in Albuquerque and Bernalillo County are mainstays of the regional economy Arts and cultural industries g enerate $1.2 billion in revenues, $413 million in wages, and 19,500 jobs, totaling 6% of all employment in the County Half of this activity is funded by dollars from outside the region, generating economic growth and opportunity. This is a 24 page summary on the larger report.
PDF Version [1.0 MB]

The Economic Importance of the Arts and Cultural Industries in ABQ and Bernalillo Cty Brochure
August 1, 2007
The Arts and Cultural Industries in Albuquerque and Bernalillo County are mainstays of the regional economy Arts and cultural industries g enerate $1.2 billion in revenues, $413 million in wages, and 19,500 jobs, totaling 6% of all employment in the County Half of this activity is funded by dollars from outside the region, generating economic growth and opportunity. This is the Quick Look Brochure.
PDF Version [282.7 K]

Santa Fe Design Week: A Pilot Study
January 1, 2007
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico was contracted by the City of Santa Fe Economic Development Division to conduct a baseline economic impact and program evaluation of Santa Fe Design Week (SFDW). SFDW is a week-long symposium bringing together design professionals from areas such as graphic design, furniture design, architecture, fashion design and sustainable energy and water design from Santa Fe (SF) and around the world. The event is a collection of presentations, demonstrations, tours and workshops aimed at educating professionals and the general public of the newest innovations in the design industries. In the long term, the goal of SFDW is to promote various design industries in a way that helps expand markets and create local career opportunities in these fields.
PDF Version [188.1 K]

The Economic Importance of the Arts & Cultural Industries in Santa Fe Cty (Executive Summary)
November 1, 2004
In 2002, Santa Fe’s arts & cultural industries (A&CI) and cultural tourism generated over $1 billion in receipts, employed 12,567 workers (17.5% of total employment in Santa Fe county), and paid $231.5 million in wages and salaries. Just over one-half of employment and wages are generated by industries that are either directly engaged in the creation, presentation or preservation of art and/or cultural activities, or indirectly engaged with cultural content but not themselves “source activities”. The balance is generated by the tourism industry to the extent that tourism is associated with an interest in Santa Fe’s art, cultural and historical attractions.
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The Economic Importance of the Arts & Cultural Industries in Santa Fe County - Quant Impacts
November 1, 2004
Part 1 of this research project quantified the contribution of Arts and cultural industries (A&CIs), including cultural tourism, to Santa Fe's economy. The results, based on 2002 data, were impressive: A&CIs are responsible for nearly 4 of every 10 dollars that flow into Santa Fe county; one out of every 6 workers in the county are directly or indirectly employed by the A&CIs, including cultural tourism; Santa Fe's A&CIs rank as one of the top industries in New Mexico, comparable to Intel and UNM in terms of direct, indirect and induced employment and wages; public revenues far exceed expenditures for arts and culture – a nearly 400% return for City and 40% return for State government expenditures. The
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The Economic Importance of the Arts & Cultural Industries in Santa Fe Cty - Quant Analysis
November 1, 2004
The purpose of Part 2 of this project is to look behind these numbers and examine the social and economic dynamics that link arts and culture to other sectors of the community of Santa Fe. The premise of this work is that a better understanding of underlying dynamics will enable industry leaders and the community to leverage the assets of the arts & culture sector to create a broader pattern of economic growth and increase benefits to the city’s population. To investigate these dynamics BBER conducted nearly 100 in-depth interviews with people representing various sectors of the community; analyzed demographic and historical economic data; and reviewed academic and planning literature on issues relevant to experiences and challenges faced by Santa Fe.
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Biotechnology

UNM's Science and Technology Corporation: The Impact of Start-up Companies
January 1, 2011
The Science and Technology Corporation (STC) asked the Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) to conduct a study of the economic impact of start-up companies using STC technologies on the economy of New Mexico. BBER conducted a similar analysis in 2004 and is available on the STC website (http://stc.unm.edu/about/metrics.php). This analysis updates the 2004 study and emphasizes the impact of high-tech start-up companies that have had a relationship with STC from 2004 to the present. Of the 16 companies included in the survey, 12 are headquartered in New Mexico. Nevertheless, all companies conduct operations within New Mexico. Table 1 shows the relevant companies along with start-up date and a short company description (Authors: Michael O'Donnell)
PDF Version [224.1 K]

Economic Census

A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
February 1, 2011
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
PDF Version [2.1 MB]

A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the NM Counties
December 1, 2009
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the NM Counties
PDF Version [1.5 MB]

A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
March 1, 2009
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
PDF Version [2.1 MB]

Silver City MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
February 1, 2008
Considering the long term impact of the decline of copper mining in southwestern New Mexico, Silver City's economy is very stable, with significant advantages as a regional retail, service, and educational center and in its growing hospitality and related real estate sectors.
PDF Version [943.3 K]

Gallup MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2006
Gallup’s population is young but slowly growing (5% increase population between 1990-2000). Per capita incomes in Gallup are on par with the State average, and above that of most other New Mexican communities outside of Albuquerque and Santa Fe. Incomes in Gallup are more than twice those of other parts of McKinley County – per capita incomes in Gallup in 2000 were $15,789, compared to only $7,682 in other parts of the County. Gallup has a huge surplus in taxable gross receipts, nearly $230 million in 2002, providing for solid city finances and opportunities for community investment. However, the data suggests a long-term erosion of Gallup’s strong market position.

Economic Development

New Mexico Taxes and Economic Development Whitepaper
May 25, 2016
The State’s tax system has a major structural problem and it relates to the gross receipts tax. New Mexico enacted an Emergency School Tax in 1935 to fund public schools with a state-level sales tax. In most states, public education is funded with local property taxes but in 1935 a statewide sales tax was chosen because it was the only tax capable of raising the revenue required. Later, New Mexico instituted a public school funding formula to deal with the inequalities in public school funding capacity across the State. Together, these actions firmly fixed the responsibility for funding public schools on the State’s General Fund.
PDF Version [95.8 K]

Barelas MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
June 1, 2015
The history of Barelas is closely tied to the history of transportation in the area. Originally settled as the private estancia of Pedro Varela, the community was established as an official settlement by the Spanish government in 1662. The original settlement boundaries included an essential river crossing along the Camino Real – where now stands the bridge across the Rio Grande on Bridge Boulevard. Growth of the community was slow, with just 350 residents according to the 1880 census and the economy of the community was primarily agricultural until the coming of the railroad in the 1880’s. At the time, Albuquerque was a mile and a half from the train station, whereas Barelas was quite close. Barelas’ location just south of New Town and just west of the rail yard lead to Barelas’s boom years, as the Barelas’ economy pivoted from agriculture to railroad related industries and Barelas’ boom years began. By 1900 Barelas’ population was up to 1200. In 1891, Barelas was incorporated into Albuquerque, ending its era as a self-standing village. Until 1937 Route 66 ran along 4th Street, Bridge Boulevard and Isleta – providing an important local and tourist base for commercial development along 4th Street – where local residents could find services including grocery stores, drug stores, etc. The re-routing of Route 66 along Central Avenue in 1937, the supplanting of US 85 with I-25 as the major north-south route through Albuquerque in the 1950’s further decreased outside traffic through the area, and was a blow to the businesses along the corridor. The final blow to the 4th Street businesses was the converting of 4th Street into the Civic plaza in 1974, resulting in the total loss of 4th Street as even a secondary artery through the city. It was also in the early 1970’s that the Santa Fe Railway shops closed, eliminating 1500 jobs from Barelas and negatively affecting the ability of the Barelas community to support 4th Street businesses . As the Barelas business community along 4th street struggled and closed in the ‘70’s, Barelas’ residents looked to the South Valley Bridge corridor for their needs – until this business district too hit hard times with the widening of Bridge from two lanes to four – the construction process, razing of buildings, and resulting speeding up of traffic had deleterious effects on business in the area.

Harding County MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
June 1, 2015
Harding County MainStreet runs the 19 mile stretch of the Fronterra Del Llano Scenic Byway (Highway 39) from the southern edge of Mosquero to the northern edge of Roy. Harding County is the entryway to the Llano Estacado. The first written account of the area came from Coronado’s 1540 expedition in which he wrote about the area’s potential as grazing lands. Traditionally the territory of the Apache, Comanche, and Kiowa, no Spanish or Mexican land grants were recorded in the county, however, Hispanic settlement in the area dates at least as far back as the Mexican territorial era. Anglo settlement came to the area with the Homestead Act of 1862. In 1901 the Dawson Coal Company was founded and by 1902, a rail spur was completed between Tucumcari and the new coal mines, running through Roy, Solano and Mosquero. With the closure of the mines in Dawson in 1950, the rail spur was discontinued. Harding County has been losing population ever since.

South Valley MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
June 1, 2015
The South Valley was founded as the Atrisco Merced in 1692 and comprised of several small villages including Atrisco, Arenal, Los Padillas and Armijo, among others. The plazas of these historic settlements have lost their centrality and are little known except to long-time residents. As was true for much of north and central New Mexico, the local economy was dominated by agriculture into the early to mid- 20th century with the increased importance of wage-labor in the New Mexico economy. The area was a major regional producer of agricultural goods – in particular sheep and wool products with as many as 70 registered looms once recorded in the Valley. The South Valley MainStreet district runs along a thoroughfare that has been in use since at least the 1500’s as the Camino Real. The bridge of Bridge Boulevard runs above the original river ford on the Camino Real. In the late 1930’s Route 66 was realigned to follow what is now Central Avenue. With the development of the interstates and growth in the Northeast quadrant of Albuquerque, South Valley businesses began to decline. The expansion of Bridge Boulevard to four lanes in the 1980’s further hurt the economic corridor on Bridge with the speeding up of traffic and the razing of old buildings and closure of local businesses during and after construction.

Truth or Consequences MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
June 1, 2015
The Truth or Consequences MainStreet District encompasses a large area along Main St. and Marr Ave to the North and South and the Rio Grande River and Main St. to the East and West respectively. Located right along I-25, nearly equidistant from Albuquerque and El Paso, Truth or Consequences was originally within the home territory of the Chehene Apache, the easternmost band of the Chiricahua Apache. The Apache were forcibly removed in the late 1800’s. Efforts at permanent settlement by the Spanish community didn’t occur until the latter half of the 1800’s and came in fits and starts until early 1900’s with the construction of Elephant Butte Dam. Since the community’s incorporation as Hot Springs in 1916, health-related tourism has been a central industry to the development of the community. Once called ‘The City of Health’, Truth or Consequences took advantage of the health tourism industry in New Mexico in the ‘20’s, ‘30’s and ‘40’s and is said to have been home to over 40 hot springs hotels prior to World War II. Health tourism declined after World War II and the local economy began to decline. The interest among retirees seeking low cost of living and a temperate climate continued through the 1980’s. The ‘90’s saw interest in the town by artists and other creative and counter-culture types and some efforts at revitalization but out-migration continues to be a problem.

Zuni MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
June 1, 2014
Located in the Northwestern region of New Mexico, the Zuni Pueblo is located approximately 150 miles west of Albuquerque and roughly 35 miles south of Gallup. The Reservation covers over 418,000 acres and lies on the western border of New Mexico and the eastern border of Arizona. The predominately Native American community is comprised primarily of people who identify as belonging to the Zuni (A:shiwi) tribe. The Zuni people have inhabited the Southwest for thousands of years and have traditions deeply rooted in agriculture, art, and jewelry making. Due to its relative geographic isolation, the Zuni tribe has maintained a very unique language that is still spoken today. (Authors: Dr. Lee Reynis, Gillian Joyce, Ashley Hooper, Mary Louise Gucik, Daren Ruiz)

STC.UNM: The Impact of Start-UP Companies on the New Mexico Economy
June 1, 2014
The STC.UNM is the technology transfer and economic development organizatin of UNM. STC.UNM commissioned BBER to conduct a study of the economic impact of start-up companies using STC tech on the NM economy. (Author: Daren Ruiz)
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Belen MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
March 1, 2014
The City of Belen, established in 1741, is located in south central Valencia County in the valley on the west side of the Rio Grande River. The Belen MainStreet District is displayed on Map 1, which may be found in the Appendix.The District within the main population and commercial center of the City of Belen and is bounded by Main Street on the west, Reinken on the North, the railroad tracks on the east, and Baca on much of the South. As can be seen on the map, City boundaries expand from this central area up to the northwest through the Sausal area with shoe string annexations that include major retail, like Walmart, and attach a large area on both sides of I-25 that is the southern portion of the planned Rancho Cielo development. On the west, the City limits have been drawn to include the airport. On the south, the City expands along the railroad tracks into the Pueblitos area, and to the east the City expands in a corridor to the Rio Grande River. Across the river is the major development of Rio Communities.
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The Economic Impact of SV Economic Development Center on the Bernalillo County Economy
November 1, 2011
The University of New Mexico?s Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) was commissioned by the Rio Grande Community Development Corporation (RGCDC) to estimate the economic impact of businesses affiliated with the South Valley Economic Development Center (SVEDC) on the Bernalillo County economy for Calendar Year 2010. SVEDC-affiliated businesses are defined as businesses that are currently using or have formerly used SVEDC resources. SVEDC current tenants or service recipients: 77 SVEDC graduates: 32 Total beneficiaries: 109 Total business employment impact: 298 jobs Total wages and salary impact: $3.93 million Total business activity impact: $8.97 million (Authors: Doleswar Bhandari)
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UNM's Science and Technology Corporation: The Impact of Start-up Companies
January 1, 2011
The Science and Technology Corporation (STC) asked the Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) to conduct a study of the economic impact of start-up companies using STC technologies on the economy of New Mexico. BBER conducted a similar analysis in 2004 and is available on the STC website (http://stc.unm.edu/about/metrics.php). This analysis updates the 2004 study and emphasizes the impact of high-tech start-up companies that have had a relationship with STC from 2004 to the present. Of the 16 companies included in the survey, 12 are headquartered in New Mexico. Nevertheless, all companies conduct operations within New Mexico. Table 1 shows the relevant companies along with start-up date and a short company description (Authors: Michael O'Donnell)
PDF Version [224.1 K]

Lovington MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
February 1, 2009
Lovington’s population growth has been essentially flat since at least 1990, but the proportionately large share of youth suggests some possibility of relief, especially in labor markets, in coming years. However, low levels of educational achievement and an extreme lack of housing will continue to present challenges.

Deming MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
March 1, 2008
Lovington’s population growth has been essentially flat since at least 1990, but the proportionately large share of youth suggests some possibility of relief, especially in labor markets, in coming years. However, low levels of educational achievement and an extreme lack of housing will continue to present challenges.

Las Cruces MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
March 1, 2008
Lovington’s population growth has been essentially flat since at least 1990, but the proportionately large share of youth suggests some possibility of relief, especially in labor markets, in coming years. However, low levels of educational achievement and an extreme lack of housing will continue to present challenges.

Population, Housing, and Education in Lea County: Community Improvement Corporation Report
November 13, 2007
Population, Housing, and Education in Lea County: Report to the Lea County Community Improvement Corporation
PDF Version [2.3 MB]

Employer Survey: A Report to the Lea County Community Improvement Corporation (Lea Economy)
November 13, 2007
Survey of Lea County Employers (in connection with the report on The Economy of Lea County and the Larger Region) a Report to the Lea County Community Improvement Corporation
PDF Version [304.5 K]

The Economy of Lea County and the Larger Region: Report to Community Improvement Corporation
November 13, 2007
The Economy of Lea County and the Larger Region: Report to the Lea County Community Improvement Corporation
PDF Version [781.2 K]

2007 Lea County Economic Development Studies
November 13, 2007

Corrales MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
November 1, 2007
Corrales is second only to Los Alamos as the wealthiest community in New Mexico. According to estimates by ESRI®, based on 2000 census data, per capita income in Corrales was $42,651, nearly twice the statewide average. The household median income is estimated at $80,344; the average income is skewed slightly higher.

Grants MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
November 1, 2007
Incomes in Grants are low, but on par with those of smaller communities in New Mexico. Per capita income is estimated at $17,312 (compared to $21,756 for the state); median household income is $35,390 ($41,539 for the state). Grants has a well balanced economy, though incomes are somewhat low. The city has a roughly equal number of jobs and employed residents (3,382 jobs and 3,440 employed), though about one quarter of employed residents work outside the city with a proportionate number of local jobs filled by residents of other areas.

Bernalillo MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
October 1, 2007
Located less than 20 miles from downtown Albuquerque, Bernalillo is predominately and increasingly a residential community. In 2006, about 3,400 residents of Bernalillo were employed, while reported employment by Bernalillo-based businesses was about 1,900. Thus, nearly half of Bernalillo's workforce was employed outside the town. Yet, Bernalillo also has a remarkably diverse economy, including a strong manufacturing sector and a service hub along key transportation arteries. On a net basis, Bernalillo retains an estimated 85 percent of locally-originated receipts, resulting in a leakage of about $20 million in receipts per year.

Clovis MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
May 1, 2007
Clovis serves as a principal center for the NMEP region. However, given the advantages of its situation and the proximity of major employers such as Cannon Air Force Base (AFB), the local economy under-performs with respect to expectations. As a whole, the pull factor for Clovis’ economy in 2005 was 95 percent, resulting in leakages of about $36 million (with respect to the state of New Mexico).

Artesia MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
Artesia’s population is relatively stable, though slowly growing; the rate of growth of the Hispanic population far exceeds that of the White/non-Hispanic population; levels of educational attainment are very low. For a small community of 11,000, Artesia’s economy is diverse. The economy has strong ‘base industries’ (including oil & gas, utilities, construction, wholesale trade, transportation, federal government) that bring dollars into the community and strong retail and service sectors that recycle these dollars among local businesses.

Carlsbad MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
Carlsbad’s population is relatively stable, though slowly growing; there is a small decline in the senior population which is contrary to the graying pattern seen in other parts of the southeast New Mexico (SE NM) region. Educational attainment has shown some improvement at the grade school level, but this has not yet translated into significant gains in post-secondary education. On a net basis, economic leakages (money spent by local residents outside the community) exceed inflows (residents of other communities spending money in Carlsbad) by about 10 percent, resulting in a net leakage of about $57 million in 2005.

Hobbs MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
Demographic patterns in Hobbs are troubling – the population is declining and becoming much older, the ethnic transition is very rapid, and levels of educational attainment are very low and not improving. Hobbs’ economy is driven by the oil and gas economy, and is therefore subject to wide swings of boom and bust. When the market for the resources is strong, wealth is generated, but complexities hinder the distribution of this wealth to the labor force and make long term planning and investment problematic.

Portales MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
Portales’ population in 2000 was 10,848, up slightly from 1990. The age structure is somewhat more favorable than in other parts of the New Mexico Eastern Plains region (NMEP), at least in terms of economic prospects. Portales is a university town that also serves as the seat and service center for Roosevelt County and its agricultural economy. In terms of taxable gross receipts, Portales stands in a negative and declining balance with respect to New Mexico as a whole, but this outflow of about $35 million (2005) is at least partially offset by public sector and nontaxable revenues generated by ENMU.

Roswell MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
As in other parts of Southeastern New Mexico, New Mexico as a whole, and indeed throughout the U.S., the trend in Roswell is toward an older and more Hispanic population. Incomes in Roswell are on par with area averages, but well below the statewide level. As the largest city in southeastern New Mexico, Roswell functions as the region’s economic hub. However, trends suggest that the city’s economic strength has begun to wane under the pressure of demographic change.

Santa Rosa MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
Demographic patterns in Santa Rosa are strongly impacted by the GEO-administered prison. Census data are skewed by the inclusion of the inmate population; the non-institutionalized population shows sharp declines in the population of children and elderly. On an aggregate level, Santa Rosa’s economy is strong, providing for solid public finances.

Tucumcari MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
Tucumcari has experienced a very sharp decline of its population, from 6,831 in 1990 to 6,026 in 2000 – a 12 percent decline. Changes in educational attainment track an interesting pattern in Tucumcari, generally revealing a polarization in the community. Tucumcari’s economy has been in steady decline for years; development initiatives have brought some stability, but new sources of revenues are needed to provide the community with jobs and funds for public finances.

Santa Fe Design Week: A Pilot Study
January 1, 2007
This project serves as a pilot study whose functions are to identify major issues and concerns pertaining to Santa Fe design industries and SFDW and to inform a more rigorous data collection process in the future. To accomplish these objectives, BBER distributed information sheets to SFDW attendees to collect demographic characteristics, mailed out a survey to design businesses in Santa Fe to learn more about design business practices and conducted focus groups (FGs) to get a valuable "close look" at the experiences, opinions and perspectives of those who were involved in SFDW in a variety of capacities. (Authors: Billy Ulibarri, Myra Segal)
PDF Version [188.1 K]

Digital Media Industry for Dean Christopher Mead, College of Fine Arts of UNM
January 1, 2007
Digital media plays a central role in a number of emerging industries, including motion picture and sound recording industries, software publishing, computer systems design, advertising, and others. By all measures, the field of digital media is posed for significant growth and represents a promising avenue for economic development for New Mexico. (Author: Jeffrey Mitchell)
PDF Version [61.6 K]

The Economic Impact of Nonprofit Organizations in New Mexico
December 31, 2006
This is the first time that a Report has assembled research on the nonprofit sector and its economic contributions to New Mexico. In the recent past, we saw a similar study pertaining solely to the arts and cultural industries in Santa Fe County. The findings of that study, prepared by the Bureau of Business of Economic Research at UNM, persuaded us that a similar study on the economic impact of the statewide nonprofit sector would be illuminating. (Author: Jeffrey Mitchell)
PDF Version [496.8 K]

Chama MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
July 1, 2006
Between 1990 and 2000 Chama’s population increased from 1,048 to 1,199 persons. The 14.4% increase was slightly below the statewide increase of 20%. Data is not available for the town for the period since the 2000 Census; the best estimate is for Rio Arriba County, which saw a population decline of 0.6% between 2000 and 2005. Per capita incomes in Chama are only slightly below the statewide average and for a rural area in New Mexico relatively high.

Springer MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
July 1, 2006
According US Census Bureau data, Springer’s population remained almost unchanged between 1990 and 2000, settling at 1,285 in 2000. Businesses in Springer face a great challenge, as local residents tend to spend far more of their income outside the community than others bring to Springer.

Clayton MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2006
Clayton’s population grew very slightly during the period 1990-2000, consistent with the broader tends in Union County and northeastern New Mexico as a whole. In 2002, Clayton had a modest surplus of $7 million taxable gross receipts, providing for reasonably solid town finances.

Las Vegas MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2006
By both U.S. and New Mexican standards, Las Vegas’ population is stable and young. Per capita incomes in Las Vegas are very low ($12,619 vs. $17,261 for New Mexico); per capita income in the town of Las Vegas, the seat of San Miguel County, is below that of the County ($13,268). Las Vegas has a large surplus in taxable gross receipts, providing for solid town finances.

Raton MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2006
Raton’s population is stagnant (slight decline in population between 1990-2000). Per capita incomes in Raton are low ($14,224 vs. $17,261 for New Mexico, comparable to Colfax as a whole) and unemployment rates are very high (7.2% vs. 3.3% for New Mexico in 2000). A large share of Raton’s households depend on fixed income (38.9% receive Social Security benefits vs. 25.5% for New Mexico, 23.5% receive retirement benefits vs. 17.4% for New Mexico). Overall, Raton has a strong surplus in taxable gross receipts, providing for solid town finances.

Economic Impact Analysis

Economic Impacts of the NM Small Business Investment Corporation
May 8, 2018
Charged with furthering economic development activities in the state of New Mexico by supporting small businesses through debt and equity, the SBIC commissioned UNMBBER with conducting an independent economic impact analysis of their investment activities between 2011 and 2015. The three principal measurements employed by this study are Labor Income, Employment, and Output. This study estimates that SBIC investment activities generated $69 million in cumulative Output. The Labor Income impact of the SBIC was $23.9 million for the study period. Jobs created by the SBIC investment activities totaled 646.
PDF Version [746.4 K]

New Mexico Sun Path Program Return on Investment
September 1, 2017

Economic Impact Evaluation Of Proposed Edith Waste Transfer Station
June 1, 2017

Economic and Fiscal Impacts of the Medicaid Expansion in NM Since Implementation in 2014
May 25, 2016
This brief updates a previous analysis performed by UNM BBER on the likely impacts of Medicaid Expansion in New Mexico. Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) as enacted on March 23, 2010, states were required to extend Medicaid coverage to low-income adults under 65 years old with incomes up to 133% percent of the poverty level (138% after income disregards). However, the Supreme Court held that the federal government cannot withhold current Medicaid funding should a state decide to opt out of the Medicaid Expansion. When the previous report was written, New Mexico had not decided whether to implement the Medicaid Expansion. Subsequently, in January 2013, Governor Susana Martinez announced her decision to have New Mexico participate in the expansion. This brief examines: 1. The additional flow of federal Medicaid dollars to the State of New Mexico since January 2014 as more and more eligible adults signed up to participate in the Medicaid Expansion and provides projections for the program through State Fiscal Year 2021. The projections through FY 2020 are based on enrollment and cost projections by the NM Health and Human Services Department (HSD) in December 2015. Details are in many cases informed by HSD projections that were made in conjunction with their September submission for the 2017 Budget cycle. 2. Related to the ACA and the Medicaid Expansion, changes in federal and state programs designed to cover uncompensated care. 3. The emerging economic data that reflect the impacts of the Medicaid Expansion to date. 4. An analysis of the economic impacts on New Mexico of the Medicaid Expansion (including new job creation) since implementation in 2014 and as may be expected between now and 2021. 5. Actual and anticipated impacts of the Medicaid Expansion on the State General Fund.
PDF Version [657.8 K]

Economic Impacts of the UNM Health Sciences Center on the New Mexico Economy
December 1, 2014
The University of New Mexico Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) was commissioned by the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center (UNM HSC) to estimate its economic impact on the State of New Mexico for the fiscal year 2013. This report describes the impacts, in terms of jobs, income, economic output and taxes, of UNM HSC on the State economy.
PDF Version [1.8 MB]

Economic Analysis of New Mexico's Sustainable Building Tax Credit
December 1, 2014
An analysis of New Mexico's Sustainable Building Tax Credit and its impacts on the NM economy, household expenditures, and the environment.
PDF Version [2.2 MB]

Building on the Past, Facing the Future: Renewing the Creative Economy of New Mexico
August 1, 2014
The arts and cultural industries are among the main drivers of New Mexico’s economy. Arts and culture in New Mexico enjoy a national reputation far beyond the state’s size or economic standing. With the proper level of support and evolution, the arts and cultural industries could be leveraged to help power the New Mexico economy as it emerges from the economic recession. To appreciate the importance of arts and culture to New Mexico’s economy, consider that these industries are the primary source of employment for 43,031 New Mexicans –roughly equal to the state’s construction industry and 50% larger than the manufacturing industry. The arts and cultural industries account for about 1 of every 18 jobs in the state (5.5%). These industries pay $1.37 billion in wages and salaries, roughly equal to the total paid by the state’s mining industry, and more than the total paid by hotels and restaurants. These figures are based on a narrow definition of the A&C industries. If we include persons employed cultural tourism, arts and cultural education and industries linked to the unique culture and heritage of the state (e.g. crafts, salsa, and adobe), the arts and cultural industries employ 76,780 persons - equal to about one in ten jobs (9.8%) in the state. That is more than the construction and manufacturing industries combined. Arts and cultural industries generate $137.1 million in revenues for state and local governments in New Mexico. Approximately two-thirds of the total is received by the state government as gross receipts taxes, income taxes paid by cultural workers, federal transfers and various fees and private grants. The total cost of cultural services to public agencies in New Mexico is $168.0 million. Most of these costs are borne by local (and especially municipal) governments, with the largest share of the funds allocated to libraries as well as museums and cultural services and events. These figures do not include revenues or spending on public education.
PDF Version [1.9 MB]

STC.UNM: The Impact of Start-UP Companies on the New Mexico Economy
June 1, 2014
The STC.UNM is the technology transfer and economic development organizatin of UNM. STC.UNM commissioned BBER to conduct a study of the economic impact of start-up companies using STC tech on the NM economy. (Author: Daren Ruiz)
PDF Version [207.2 K]

Economic Impacts of Albuquerque Airport System on the New Mexico Economy
August 1, 2013
The purpose of this study is to estimate the economic impact of Albuquerque International Sunport and Double Eagle II airports in the state of New Mexico. It measures impacts of these airports in terms of jobs, income, economic output and taxes. (Author: Doleswar Bhandari, Ph.D)
PDF Version [3.9 MB]

Economic Impact of the School for Advanced Research on the Economies of Santa Fe County and NM
January 1, 2013
The University of New Mexico Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) was commissioned by the School for Advanced Research (SAR) to estimate the economic impact of SAR on the economies of Santa Fe County and the State of New Mexico for the fiscal year 2011-2012 (FY12).
PDF Version [692.5 K]

Impacts of the Debt Control Act of 2011 on the NM Economy
December 1, 2012
The Debt Control Act, negotiated by Congress and the President in August 2011, calls for at least a $2.2 trillion reduction in federal government spending through 2021. Although the details have been left resolved pending negotiations to be concluded in November, the Act does necessitate cuts of $917 billion in the first tranche and additional cuts of at least $1.2 trillion to follow. In this brief section, we estimate the potential impacts of these cuts on New Mexico?s economy, using assumptions based on the general terms of a sequestering process that is to go into effect if negotiations fail to offer alternative budgetary outcomes.
PDF Version [34.7 K]

Economic and Fiscal Impacts of the Proposed Medical Expansion in New Mexico
October 31, 2012
This brief analyzes the economic and fiscal impacts of the Medicaid Expansion in New Mexico. Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) as enacted on March 23, 2010, states were required to extend Medicaid coverage to low-income adults under 65 years old with incomes up to 133% percent of the poverty level (138% after income disregards). However, the Supreme Court held that the federal government cannot withhold current Medicaid funding should a state decide to opt out of the Medicaid Expansion. At this time, New Mexico has not decided whether to implement the Medicaid Expansion. (Authors: Lee Reynis)
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The Economic Impact of Dona Ana Community College in Dona Ana County in FY11
May 1, 2012
Dona Ana Community College (DACC) commissioned University of New Mexico?s Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) to analyze the economic impact of its operation on the Dona Ana County economy for fiscal year (FY) 2011. BBER estimated conventional economic impacts of DACC using IMPLAN, an economic impact analysis model. The economic impacts of DACC arise from several sources including college operation and capital spending, out-of-county student spending and the additional earnings of DACC graduates and noncredit students who earn higher wages and salaries because of their education and who remain in the county after completion of their degree, certificate and training. (Doleswar Bhandari, Ph.D.)
PDF Version [434.9 K]

Air Force Research Laboratory Kirtland AFB, NM; FY09 Economic Impact Assessment
May 1, 2012
The University of New Mexico's Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) was commissioned by the New Mexico Institute of Mining and technology, an Air Force Research Laboratory partnership intermediary, to estimate the economic impact of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) at Kirtland Air Force Base (Kirtland AFB) on the economy of New Mexico for Federal Fiscal Year 2009 (FY09). This analysis covers the economic impact of the Directed Energy Directorate (RD) and the Space Vehicles Directorate (RV), hereafter referred to as AFRL, and which constitute the Phillips Research Site (PRS) at Kirtland in Albuquerque, NM. (Authors: Doleswar Bhandari, Jessica Bloom)
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The Economic Impact of SV Economic Development Center on the Bernalillo County Economy
November 1, 2011
The University of New Mexico?s Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) was commissioned by the Rio Grande Community Development Corporation (RGCDC) to estimate the economic impact of businesses affiliated with the South Valley Economic Development Center (SVEDC) on the Bernalillo County economy for Calendar Year 2010. SVEDC-affiliated businesses are defined as businesses that are currently using or have formerly used SVEDC resources. SVEDC current tenants or service recipients: 77 SVEDC graduates: 32 Total beneficiaries: 109 Total business employment impact: 298 jobs Total wages and salary impact: $3.93 million Total business activity impact: $8.97 million (Authors: Doleswar Bhandari)
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Economic Impact of Los Alamos National Laboratory on Northern New Mexico and the State
March 1, 2011
LANL injected more than $1.4 billion directly into the northern New Mexico economy during FY 2009. These injections provided more than 11,200 direct jobs, nearly $1.1 billion labor income and $1.4 billion economic output to the region. LANL?s expenditures also indirectly supported approximately 9,300 jobs, more than $317 million in labor income and $932 million economic output in this region (Table 3.1). The total economic impact of LANL to the region is approximately 20,531 in employment, $1.4 billion in labor income, and $2.3 billion in economic output. In addition, a total of 3,050 LANL retirees with $140 million in pension benefits are estimated to have supported an additional 821 jobs with $26 million in labor income (Table 4.1). Northern New Mexico consists of the seven counties of Los Alamos, Santa Fe, Rio Arriba, Sandoval, Taos, San Miguel and Mora. (Author: Dolewsar Bhandari, PhD)
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The Economic Impact of the University of New Mexico on the State of New Mexico (February 2011)
February 1, 2011
This study focuses on the economic impacts resulting from UNM spending and employment. The computed impacts show how the dollars that flow to UNM from outside of New Mexico (out-of-state) sources support direct spending on salaries, benefits, and goods and services. The impacts also show how spending creates additional, derivative, economic activity in the state of New Mexico.1 For instance, UNM’s expenditures on goods and services create indirect effects as the firms supplying UNM purchase supplies from other firms and employ people to produce their products. Part of salaries of UNM employees and UNM vendors are then spent in the community, creating induced effects, causing further demand for goods and services and resulting in more jobs and additional income. The indirect and induced effects, combined with the direct contribution of UNM funded by out-of-state sources, result in the total economic impact of the University of New Mexico on the state of New Mexico. However, it is important to note that this is not the maximum impact from UNM. Impacts of other factors such as encouraging technology development and contributing to an educated workforce are likely to be substantial even if they are less easily quantified.
PDF Version [268.4 K]

UNM's Science and Technology Corporation: The Impact of Start-up Companies
January 1, 2011
The Science and Technology Corporation (STC) asked the Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) to conduct a study of the economic impact of start-up companies using STC technologies on the economy of New Mexico. BBER conducted a similar analysis in 2004 and is available on the STC website (http://stc.unm.edu/about/metrics.php). This analysis updates the 2004 study and emphasizes the impact of high-tech start-up companies that have had a relationship with STC from 2004 to the present. Of the 16 companies included in the survey, 12 are headquartered in New Mexico. Nevertheless, all companies conduct operations within New Mexico. Table 1 shows the relevant companies along with start-up date and a short company description (Authors: Michael O'Donnell)
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Federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Stimulus Funding on Economy
December 1, 2010
This report examines the impacts of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) on the economy of New Mexico. ARRA has allocated $5.7 billion to New Mexico, of which over $2.6 billion had been spent through June 30. 2010. (Authors: Lee Reynis, Doleswar Bhandari)
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New Mexico Business Current Economic Report: Overview of Economic Impact Analysis
October 1, 2010
New Mexico Business Current Economic Report: Overview of Economic Impact Analysis
PDF Version [75.2 K]

Econ Impacts of the Anticipated Non-Accreditation of Bernalillo Co Levees - Part 2: Development
September 1, 2010
Economic Impacts of the Anticipated Non-Accreditation of Bernalillo County Levees - Part 2: Development Impacts (Authors: Daren Ruiz, Molly Bleecker)
PDF Version [2.4 MB]

Econ Impacts of the Anticipated Non-Accreditation of Bernalillo Co Levees - Part 1: Flood Ins
September 1, 2010
Economic Impacts of the Anticipated Non-Accreditation of Bernalillo County Levees - Part 1: Estimated Cost of Increased Flood Insurance (Authors: Daren Ruiz, Molly Bleecker)
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Estimated Economic Impacts of the Buckman Direct Diversion Project
January 30, 2009
The Buckman Direct Diversion (BDD) Project will provide an additional source of water supply for the Santa Fe area. It includes a diversion structure on the Rio Grande, pumping stations, pipelines and a new water treatment plant. The City of Santa Fe and Santa Fe County, with Las Campanas as a limited partner, are building the BDD to access San Juan-Chama Project water contracted to the City and the County and water associated with native Rio Grande water rights. The BDD water treatment plant will prepare the City and County water for use by residents and businesses. The design-build contractor is a joint venture between CH2M Hill and Western Summit Constructors. Construction began in September 2008 and will continue until the project is operational, expected before the summer in 2011. The project budget for the fiscal years commencing July 1, 2008, through project construction completion is $216 million. Prior to FY 08, professional services for planning, conceptual and preliminary design, compliance with federal environmental law, acquisition of state and federal permits, and competitive procurement of the design and build contractor cost an additional $13 million. (Authors: Lee Reynis, Dolewsar Bhandari, Andrew Webb)
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Silver City MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
February 1, 2008
Considering the long term impact of the decline of copper mining in southwestern New Mexico, Silver City's economy is very stable, with significant advantages as a regional retail, service, and educational center and in its growing hospitality and related real estate sectors.
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The Economic Impact of the University of New Mexico on the State of New Mexico
December 1, 2007
The University of New Mexico Office of the President commissioned the UNM Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) to conduct a study of the economic impact of the University of New Mexico (UNM) on the economy of New Mexico for the Fiscal year 2007. This report contains the results of the study and outlines the data and methods used to arrive at these results. This study focuses on the economic impact of spending and employment by UNM. The impacts show how the dollars that flow to UNM from out-of-state sources support direct spending on salaries, benefits, and goods and services, and how that spending creates additional economic activity in the state of New Mexico. UNM's expenditures on goods and services create indirect effects as the firms supplying UNM buy supplies from other firms and employ people to produce their products. Part of the salaries of UNM employees and UNM vendors are spent in the community, creating further demand for goods and services and resulting in more people working and additional income. However, this is not the maximum impact from UNM, as the impacts of other factors such as encouraging technology development and contributing to an educated workforce are likely to be substantial even if they are less easily quantified. (Nicholas Potter)
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2007 Lea County Economic Development Studies
November 13, 2007

The Economic Importance of the Arts & Cultural Industries in Albuquerque and Bernalillo County
August 1, 2007
The Arts and Cultural Industries in Albuquerque and Bernalillo County are mainstays of the regional economy. Arts and cultural industries generate $1.2 billion in revenues, $413 million in wages, and 19,500 jobs, totaling 6% of all employment in the County. Half of this activity is funded by dollars from outside the region, generating economic growth and opportunity.
PDF Version [1.8 MB]

The Economic Importance of the Arts and Cultural Industries in ABQ and Bernalillo Cty Summary
August 1, 2007
The Arts and Cultural Industries in Albuquerque and Bernalillo County are mainstays of the regional economy Arts and cultural industries g enerate $1.2 billion in revenues, $413 million in wages, and 19,500 jobs, totaling 6% of all employment in the County Half of this activity is funded by dollars from outside the region, generating economic growth and opportunity. This is a 24 page summary on the larger report.
PDF Version [1.0 MB]

The Economic Importance of the Arts and Cultural Industries in ABQ and Bernalillo Cty Brochure
August 1, 2007
The Arts and Cultural Industries in Albuquerque and Bernalillo County are mainstays of the regional economy Arts and cultural industries g enerate $1.2 billion in revenues, $413 million in wages, and 19,500 jobs, totaling 6% of all employment in the County Half of this activity is funded by dollars from outside the region, generating economic growth and opportunity. This is the Quick Look Brochure.
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The Economic Impact of Nonprofit Organizations in New Mexico
December 31, 2006
This is the first time that a Report has assembled research on the nonprofit sector and its economic contributions to New Mexico. In the recent past, we saw a similar study pertaining solely to the arts and cultural industries in Santa Fe County. The findings of that study, prepared by the Bureau of Business of Economic Research at UNM, persuaded us that a similar study on the economic impact of the statewide nonprofit sector would be illuminating. (Author: Jeffrey Mitchell)
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Gallup MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2006
Gallup’s population is young but slowly growing (5% increase population between 1990-2000). Per capita incomes in Gallup are on par with the State average, and above that of most other New Mexican communities outside of Albuquerque and Santa Fe. Incomes in Gallup are more than twice those of other parts of McKinley County – per capita incomes in Gallup in 2000 were $15,789, compared to only $7,682 in other parts of the County. Gallup has a huge surplus in taxable gross receipts, nearly $230 million in 2002, providing for solid city finances and opportunities for community investment. However, the data suggests a long-term erosion of Gallup’s strong market position.

The Management and Future Federal Investment in New Mexcio
April 28, 2005
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The Economic Importance of the Arts & Cultural Industries in Santa Fe Cty (Executive Summary)
November 1, 2004
In 2002, Santa Fe’s arts & cultural industries (A&CI) and cultural tourism generated over $1 billion in receipts, employed 12,567 workers (17.5% of total employment in Santa Fe county), and paid $231.5 million in wages and salaries. Just over one-half of employment and wages are generated by industries that are either directly engaged in the creation, presentation or preservation of art and/or cultural activities, or indirectly engaged with cultural content but not themselves “source activities”. The balance is generated by the tourism industry to the extent that tourism is associated with an interest in Santa Fe’s art, cultural and historical attractions.
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The Economic Importance of the Arts & Cultural Industries in Santa Fe County - Quant Impacts
November 1, 2004
Part 1 of this research project quantified the contribution of Arts and cultural industries (A&CIs), including cultural tourism, to Santa Fe's economy. The results, based on 2002 data, were impressive: A&CIs are responsible for nearly 4 of every 10 dollars that flow into Santa Fe county; one out of every 6 workers in the county are directly or indirectly employed by the A&CIs, including cultural tourism; Santa Fe's A&CIs rank as one of the top industries in New Mexico, comparable to Intel and UNM in terms of direct, indirect and induced employment and wages; public revenues far exceed expenditures for arts and culture – a nearly 400% return for City and 40% return for State government expenditures. The
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The Economic Importance of the Arts & Cultural Industries in Santa Fe Cty - Quant Analysis
November 1, 2004
The purpose of Part 2 of this project is to look behind these numbers and examine the social and economic dynamics that link arts and culture to other sectors of the community of Santa Fe. The premise of this work is that a better understanding of underlying dynamics will enable industry leaders and the community to leverage the assets of the arts & culture sector to create a broader pattern of economic growth and increase benefits to the city’s population. To investigate these dynamics BBER conducted nearly 100 in-depth interviews with people representing various sectors of the community; analyzed demographic and historical economic data; and reviewed academic and planning literature on issues relevant to experiences and challenges faced by Santa Fe.
PDF Version [470.0 K]

Economy - General

Apartment Survey Mid-April 2016: NM Mortgage Finance Authority
August 19, 2016
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico conducted a survey of apartment properties in communities across the State for the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority (MFA). Unit count, vacancy and rent data for mid-April, along with the year the structure was built, were requested for apartment complexes with five or more units.
PDF Version [706.1 K]

Update of the Census for Lea County: Survey of Lea County Employers
November 15, 2015
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico (UNM) surveyed businesses in Lea County as part of a project to analyze the changing economy of Lea County and to develop new economic forecasts and population and demographic projections for the area. The survey was conducted on-line using Survey Monkey. While the completed surveys, which numbered 117, were reasonably reflective of the underlying distribution of establishments by industry, some industries, like mining, transportation, and accommodations and food services, were under-represented both in terms of respondents and, particularly for mining, in terms of total industry employment. Others, like healthcare and social assistance, were over-represented. BBER explored employer overall satisfaction with the business climate and the local workforce. Over 70% of responding employers indicated considerable satisfaction with the local business climate, with only 7% indicating some dissatisfaction. As was true back in 2007, employers generally like the overall business climate but many seem to have concerns about the local work force: 21% indicated some dissatisfaction with work ethic and habits of those hired locally, while 22% expressed dissatisfaction with their education and training.
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Update of the Census for Lea County: The Economic Context
November 15, 2015
The Lea County economy had a dazzling run after 2010, but the high oil prices which put the economy into high gear are gone, with the West Texas Intermediate spot oil price back down in the neighborhood of $40 per barrel. Many producers had entered into hedging contracts that guaranteed high prices well into the future, so the collapse of oil prices did not immediately slow production, although rig counts and drilling activity did fall off and the contracts have come due. Lea County in the Permian Basin is a low cost area with abundant reserves. Drilling and other activities over the past few years have increased dramatically the productivity of individual oil reservoirs. In this period of lower prices, the county and the Permian Basin more generally seem to have attracted interest and investment as major companies were pulling out of more costly tight oil plays in North Dakota and elsewhere. Figure ES.1 pretty much captures the changing reality for oil in the Permian Basin and Lea County over the recent past. What distinguishes the Permian is the fact net oil production (from legacy wells as well as new) has continued to increase. Gas production is also up slightly, although prices for natural gas have continued to fall, with the Henry Hub spot price now in the neighborhood of $2.00 per MMBTU.
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Update of the Census for Lea County: Population Dynamics
November 15, 2015
Population growth in Lea County from 2000 to 2010 was its highest in decades. After a brief population boom-bust centered in the mid nineteen-eighties, the number of county residents remained relatively flat throughout the nineties. Beginning in 2000, the population began to climb steadily due to both natural increase and a net in-migration that corresponded with rising employment opportunities. More remarkable has been the continued population growth witnessed since 2010, especially in light of the flat growth and population decline that has simultaneously occurred throughout much of New Mexico. Lea County is currently the fastest growing in the state, and there are no indications that this distinction will soon be relinquished.
PDF Version [3.5 MB]

Barelas MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
June 1, 2015
The history of Barelas is closely tied to the history of transportation in the area. Originally settled as the private estancia of Pedro Varela, the community was established as an official settlement by the Spanish government in 1662. The original settlement boundaries included an essential river crossing along the Camino Real – where now stands the bridge across the Rio Grande on Bridge Boulevard. Growth of the community was slow, with just 350 residents according to the 1880 census and the economy of the community was primarily agricultural until the coming of the railroad in the 1880’s. At the time, Albuquerque was a mile and a half from the train station, whereas Barelas was quite close. Barelas’ location just south of New Town and just west of the rail yard lead to Barelas’s boom years, as the Barelas’ economy pivoted from agriculture to railroad related industries and Barelas’ boom years began. By 1900 Barelas’ population was up to 1200. In 1891, Barelas was incorporated into Albuquerque, ending its era as a self-standing village. Until 1937 Route 66 ran along 4th Street, Bridge Boulevard and Isleta – providing an important local and tourist base for commercial development along 4th Street – where local residents could find services including grocery stores, drug stores, etc. The re-routing of Route 66 along Central Avenue in 1937, the supplanting of US 85 with I-25 as the major north-south route through Albuquerque in the 1950’s further decreased outside traffic through the area, and was a blow to the businesses along the corridor. The final blow to the 4th Street businesses was the converting of 4th Street into the Civic plaza in 1974, resulting in the total loss of 4th Street as even a secondary artery through the city. It was also in the early 1970’s that the Santa Fe Railway shops closed, eliminating 1500 jobs from Barelas and negatively affecting the ability of the Barelas community to support 4th Street businesses . As the Barelas business community along 4th street struggled and closed in the ‘70’s, Barelas’ residents looked to the South Valley Bridge corridor for their needs – until this business district too hit hard times with the widening of Bridge from two lanes to four – the construction process, razing of buildings, and resulting speeding up of traffic had deleterious effects on business in the area.

Harding County MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
June 1, 2015
Harding County MainStreet runs the 19 mile stretch of the Fronterra Del Llano Scenic Byway (Highway 39) from the southern edge of Mosquero to the northern edge of Roy. Harding County is the entryway to the Llano Estacado. The first written account of the area came from Coronado’s 1540 expedition in which he wrote about the area’s potential as grazing lands. Traditionally the territory of the Apache, Comanche, and Kiowa, no Spanish or Mexican land grants were recorded in the county, however, Hispanic settlement in the area dates at least as far back as the Mexican territorial era. Anglo settlement came to the area with the Homestead Act of 1862. In 1901 the Dawson Coal Company was founded and by 1902, a rail spur was completed between Tucumcari and the new coal mines, running through Roy, Solano and Mosquero. With the closure of the mines in Dawson in 1950, the rail spur was discontinued. Harding County has been losing population ever since.

South Valley MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
June 1, 2015
The South Valley was founded as the Atrisco Merced in 1692 and comprised of several small villages including Atrisco, Arenal, Los Padillas and Armijo, among others. The plazas of these historic settlements have lost their centrality and are little known except to long-time residents. As was true for much of north and central New Mexico, the local economy was dominated by agriculture into the early to mid- 20th century with the increased importance of wage-labor in the New Mexico economy. The area was a major regional producer of agricultural goods – in particular sheep and wool products with as many as 70 registered looms once recorded in the Valley. The South Valley MainStreet district runs along a thoroughfare that has been in use since at least the 1500’s as the Camino Real. The bridge of Bridge Boulevard runs above the original river ford on the Camino Real. In the late 1930’s Route 66 was realigned to follow what is now Central Avenue. With the development of the interstates and growth in the Northeast quadrant of Albuquerque, South Valley businesses began to decline. The expansion of Bridge Boulevard to four lanes in the 1980’s further hurt the economic corridor on Bridge with the speeding up of traffic and the razing of old buildings and closure of local businesses during and after construction.

Truth or Consequences MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
June 1, 2015
The Truth or Consequences MainStreet District encompasses a large area along Main St. and Marr Ave to the North and South and the Rio Grande River and Main St. to the East and West respectively. Located right along I-25, nearly equidistant from Albuquerque and El Paso, Truth or Consequences was originally within the home territory of the Chehene Apache, the easternmost band of the Chiricahua Apache. The Apache were forcibly removed in the late 1800’s. Efforts at permanent settlement by the Spanish community didn’t occur until the latter half of the 1800’s and came in fits and starts until early 1900’s with the construction of Elephant Butte Dam. Since the community’s incorporation as Hot Springs in 1916, health-related tourism has been a central industry to the development of the community. Once called ‘The City of Health’, Truth or Consequences took advantage of the health tourism industry in New Mexico in the ‘20’s, ‘30’s and ‘40’s and is said to have been home to over 40 hot springs hotels prior to World War II. Health tourism declined after World War II and the local economy began to decline. The interest among retirees seeking low cost of living and a temperate climate continued through the 1980’s. The ‘90’s saw interest in the town by artists and other creative and counter-culture types and some efforts at revitalization but out-migration continues to be a problem.

Economic Impacts of the UNM Health Sciences Center on the New Mexico Economy
December 1, 2014
The University of New Mexico Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) was commissioned by the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center (UNM HSC) to estimate its economic impact on the State of New Mexico for the fiscal year 2013. This report describes the impacts, in terms of jobs, income, economic output and taxes, of UNM HSC on the State economy.
PDF Version [1.8 MB]

Building on the Past, Facing the Future: Renewing the Creative Economy of New Mexico
August 1, 2014
The arts and cultural industries are among the main drivers of New Mexico’s economy. Arts and culture in New Mexico enjoy a national reputation far beyond the state’s size or economic standing. With the proper level of support and evolution, the arts and cultural industries could be leveraged to help power the New Mexico economy as it emerges from the economic recession. To appreciate the importance of arts and culture to New Mexico’s economy, consider that these industries are the primary source of employment for 43,031 New Mexicans –roughly equal to the state’s construction industry and 50% larger than the manufacturing industry. The arts and cultural industries account for about 1 of every 18 jobs in the state (5.5%). These industries pay $1.37 billion in wages and salaries, roughly equal to the total paid by the state’s mining industry, and more than the total paid by hotels and restaurants. These figures are based on a narrow definition of the A&C industries. If we include persons employed cultural tourism, arts and cultural education and industries linked to the unique culture and heritage of the state (e.g. crafts, salsa, and adobe), the arts and cultural industries employ 76,780 persons - equal to about one in ten jobs (9.8%) in the state. That is more than the construction and manufacturing industries combined. Arts and cultural industries generate $137.1 million in revenues for state and local governments in New Mexico. Approximately two-thirds of the total is received by the state government as gross receipts taxes, income taxes paid by cultural workers, federal transfers and various fees and private grants. The total cost of cultural services to public agencies in New Mexico is $168.0 million. Most of these costs are borne by local (and especially municipal) governments, with the largest share of the funds allocated to libraries as well as museums and cultural services and events. These figures do not include revenues or spending on public education.
PDF Version [1.9 MB]

STC.UNM: The Impact of Start-UP Companies on the New Mexico Economy
June 1, 2014
The STC.UNM is the technology transfer and economic development organizatin of UNM. STC.UNM commissioned BBER to conduct a study of the economic impact of start-up companies using STC tech on the NM economy. (Author: Daren Ruiz)
PDF Version [207.2 K]

Economic Impacts of Albuquerque Airport System on the New Mexico Economy
August 1, 2013
The purpose of this study is to estimate the economic impact of Albuquerque International Sunport and Double Eagle II airports in the state of New Mexico. It measures impacts of these airports in terms of jobs, income, economic output and taxes. (Author: Doleswar Bhandari, Ph.D)
PDF Version [3.9 MB]

A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
December 1, 2012
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
PDF Version [1.8 MB]

Impacts of the Debt Control Act of 2011 on the NM Economy
December 1, 2012
The Debt Control Act, negotiated by Congress and the President in August 2011, calls for at least a $2.2 trillion reduction in federal government spending through 2021. Although the details have been left resolved pending negotiations to be concluded in November, the Act does necessitate cuts of $917 billion in the first tranche and additional cuts of at least $1.2 trillion to follow. In this brief section, we estimate the potential impacts of these cuts on New Mexico?s economy, using assumptions based on the general terms of a sequestering process that is to go into effect if negotiations fail to offer alternative budgetary outcomes.
PDF Version [34.7 K]

A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the NM Counties
December 1, 2012
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the NM Counties
PDF Version [1.2 MB]

The Economic Impact of Dona Ana Community College in Dona Ana County in FY11
May 1, 2012
Dona Ana Community College (DACC) commissioned University of New Mexico?s Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) to analyze the economic impact of its operation on the Dona Ana County economy for fiscal year (FY) 2011. BBER estimated conventional economic impacts of DACC using IMPLAN, an economic impact analysis model. The economic impacts of DACC arise from several sources including college operation and capital spending, out-of-county student spending and the additional earnings of DACC graduates and noncredit students who earn higher wages and salaries because of their education and who remain in the county after completion of their degree, certificate and training. (Doleswar Bhandari, Ph.D.)
PDF Version [434.9 K]

Commuter Rail Transit Price Elasticity of Demand: An Assessment for the New Mexico Rail Runner
September 12, 2011
The New Mexico Rail Runner (NMRX) has been in operation since July 17, 2006. Current annual operating expenses for NMRX are approximately $24 million. Although the federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) program provided NMRX with $6.8 million in annual funding in FY10, these Funds were reduced by $1.2 million in FY12. CMAQ restrictions will phase eliminate these funds by FY13. Due to the need to attain a balanced budget, the Rio Metro Regional Transit District (RMRTD) is exploring a variety of options for raising revenues and reducing operating expenses, including advertising, exploring other state and federal funding sources, schedule changes, fare increases, and using buses for less popular routes. The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) was asked to assess the potential effects of an increase in fares?and in particular the impact of fare increases on ridership ? by conducting a literature review and examining NMRX?s peer transit systems.
PDF Version [263.4 K]

A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
February 1, 2011
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
PDF Version [2.1 MB]

UNM's Science and Technology Corporation: The Impact of Start-up Companies
January 1, 2011
The Science and Technology Corporation (STC) asked the Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) to conduct a study of the economic impact of start-up companies using STC technologies on the economy of New Mexico. BBER conducted a similar analysis in 2004 and is available on the STC website (http://stc.unm.edu/about/metrics.php). This analysis updates the 2004 study and emphasizes the impact of high-tech start-up companies that have had a relationship with STC from 2004 to the present. Of the 16 companies included in the survey, 12 are headquartered in New Mexico. Nevertheless, all companies conduct operations within New Mexico. Table 1 shows the relevant companies along with start-up date and a short company description (Authors: Michael O'Donnell)
PDF Version [224.1 K]

Federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Stimulus Funding on Economy
December 1, 2010
This report examines the impacts of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) on the economy of New Mexico. ARRA has allocated $5.7 billion to New Mexico, of which over $2.6 billion had been spent through June 30. 2010. (Authors: Lee Reynis, Doleswar Bhandari)
PDF Version [633.1 K]

The Market for Affordable Housing in Taos, New Mexico
August 1, 2010
This study documents the extent to which home owner ship is beyond the means of households with permanent residence in Taos County. During the 2006-2010 (first quarter) study period, only four percent of housing units sold in the county would have been affordable to the one-third of full-time households with the lowest incomes; most of these housing units were condominiums. From the opposite perspective, fewer than 15 percent of full -time households could afford the median price of a home sold in Taos County during the period. As we narrow our focus to households who depend on local employment for their income, the mismatch becomes even more severe. Fewer than five percent of working households could afford the median price of a home in Taos County during the four-year period. (Authors: Jeffrey Mitchell, Michael O'Donnell)
PDF Version [463.4 K]

An Assessment of the San Miguel County Economy
August 1, 2010
The growth of San Miguel County population has lagged behind the rate for the state of NM, and this pattern is projected to continue during the coming years. Incomes in San Miguel County are about 20% lower than in other parts of the state. (Authors: Jeffrey Mitchell)
PDF Version [939.7 K]

A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the NM Counties
December 1, 2009
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the NM Counties
PDF Version [1.5 MB]

A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
March 1, 2009
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
PDF Version [2.1 MB]

Lovington MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
February 1, 2009
Lovington’s population growth has been essentially flat since at least 1990, but the proportionately large share of youth suggests some possibility of relief, especially in labor markets, in coming years. However, low levels of educational achievement and an extreme lack of housing will continue to present challenges.

State of the Albuquerque Economy and Forecast for the Albuquerque Economic Roundtable
January 15, 2009
State of the Albuquerque Economy and Forecast for the Albuquerque Economic Roundtable (Lee Reynis)
PDF Version [109.0 K]

Recent Population Dynamics of New Mexico Nurses
July 1, 2008
This study analyzes recent population dynamics of New Mexico nurses also with the license database from NMBON. NMCNE wants to project future nursing shortages and advocate for a commensurate increase in nursing education resources. In order to do so, a sound understanding of the changing nature of the nursing population is needed. This study explores nursing population dynamics in two sections: inflow and outflow. (Author: Daren Ruiz)
PDF Version [147.6 K]

Deming MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
March 1, 2008
Lovington’s population growth has been essentially flat since at least 1990, but the proportionately large share of youth suggests some possibility of relief, especially in labor markets, in coming years. However, low levels of educational achievement and an extreme lack of housing will continue to present challenges.

Las Cruces MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
March 1, 2008
Lovington’s population growth has been essentially flat since at least 1990, but the proportionately large share of youth suggests some possibility of relief, especially in labor markets, in coming years. However, low levels of educational achievement and an extreme lack of housing will continue to present challenges.

The Economic Impact of the University of New Mexico on the State of New Mexico
December 1, 2007
The University of New Mexico Office of the President commissioned the UNM Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) to conduct a study of the economic impact of the University of New Mexico (UNM) on the economy of New Mexico for the Fiscal year 2007. This report contains the results of the study and outlines the data and methods used to arrive at these results. This study focuses on the economic impact of spending and employment by UNM. The impacts show how the dollars that flow to UNM from out-of-state sources support direct spending on salaries, benefits, and goods and services, and how that spending creates additional economic activity in the state of New Mexico. UNM's expenditures on goods and services create indirect effects as the firms supplying UNM buy supplies from other firms and employ people to produce their products. Part of the salaries of UNM employees and UNM vendors are spent in the community, creating further demand for goods and services and resulting in more people working and additional income. However, this is not the maximum impact from UNM, as the impacts of other factors such as encouraging technology development and contributing to an educated workforce are likely to be substantial even if they are less easily quantified. (Nicholas Potter)
PDF Version [106.4 K]

Population, Housing, and Education in Lea County: Community Improvement Corporation Report
November 13, 2007
Population, Housing, and Education in Lea County: Report to the Lea County Community Improvement Corporation
PDF Version [2.3 MB]

Employer Survey: A Report to the Lea County Community Improvement Corporation (Lea Economy)
November 13, 2007
Survey of Lea County Employers (in connection with the report on The Economy of Lea County and the Larger Region) a Report to the Lea County Community Improvement Corporation
PDF Version [304.5 K]

The Economy of Lea County and the Larger Region: Report to Community Improvement Corporation
November 13, 2007
The Economy of Lea County and the Larger Region: Report to the Lea County Community Improvement Corporation
PDF Version [781.2 K]

2007 Lea County Economic Development Studies
November 13, 2007

Corrales MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
November 1, 2007
Corrales is second only to Los Alamos as the wealthiest community in New Mexico. According to estimates by ESRI®, based on 2000 census data, per capita income in Corrales was $42,651, nearly twice the statewide average. The household median income is estimated at $80,344; the average income is skewed slightly higher.

Grants MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
November 1, 2007
Incomes in Grants are low, but on par with those of smaller communities in New Mexico. Per capita income is estimated at $17,312 (compared to $21,756 for the state); median household income is $35,390 ($41,539 for the state). Grants has a well balanced economy, though incomes are somewhat low. The city has a roughly equal number of jobs and employed residents (3,382 jobs and 3,440 employed), though about one quarter of employed residents work outside the city with a proportionate number of local jobs filled by residents of other areas.

Bernalillo MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
October 1, 2007
Located less than 20 miles from downtown Albuquerque, Bernalillo is predominately and increasingly a residential community. In 2006, about 3,400 residents of Bernalillo were employed, while reported employment by Bernalillo-based businesses was about 1,900. Thus, nearly half of Bernalillo's workforce was employed outside the town. Yet, Bernalillo also has a remarkably diverse economy, including a strong manufacturing sector and a service hub along key transportation arteries. On a net basis, Bernalillo retains an estimated 85 percent of locally-originated receipts, resulting in a leakage of about $20 million in receipts per year.

Clovis MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
May 1, 2007
Clovis serves as a principal center for the NMEP region. However, given the advantages of its situation and the proximity of major employers such as Cannon Air Force Base (AFB), the local economy under-performs with respect to expectations. As a whole, the pull factor for Clovis’ economy in 2005 was 95 percent, resulting in leakages of about $36 million (with respect to the state of New Mexico).

Artesia MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
Artesia’s population is relatively stable, though slowly growing; the rate of growth of the Hispanic population far exceeds that of the White/non-Hispanic population; levels of educational attainment are very low. For a small community of 11,000, Artesia’s economy is diverse. The economy has strong ‘base industries’ (including oil & gas, utilities, construction, wholesale trade, transportation, federal government) that bring dollars into the community and strong retail and service sectors that recycle these dollars among local businesses.

Carlsbad MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
Carlsbad’s population is relatively stable, though slowly growing; there is a small decline in the senior population which is contrary to the graying pattern seen in other parts of the southeast New Mexico (SE NM) region. Educational attainment has shown some improvement at the grade school level, but this has not yet translated into significant gains in post-secondary education. On a net basis, economic leakages (money spent by local residents outside the community) exceed inflows (residents of other communities spending money in Carlsbad) by about 10 percent, resulting in a net leakage of about $57 million in 2005.

Hobbs MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
Demographic patterns in Hobbs are troubling – the population is declining and becoming much older, the ethnic transition is very rapid, and levels of educational attainment are very low and not improving. Hobbs’ economy is driven by the oil and gas economy, and is therefore subject to wide swings of boom and bust. When the market for the resources is strong, wealth is generated, but complexities hinder the distribution of this wealth to the labor force and make long term planning and investment problematic.

Portales MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
Portales’ population in 2000 was 10,848, up slightly from 1990. The age structure is somewhat more favorable than in other parts of the New Mexico Eastern Plains region (NMEP), at least in terms of economic prospects. Portales is a university town that also serves as the seat and service center for Roosevelt County and its agricultural economy. In terms of taxable gross receipts, Portales stands in a negative and declining balance with respect to New Mexico as a whole, but this outflow of about $35 million (2005) is at least partially offset by public sector and nontaxable revenues generated by ENMU.

Roswell MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
As in other parts of Southeastern New Mexico, New Mexico as a whole, and indeed throughout the U.S., the trend in Roswell is toward an older and more Hispanic population. Incomes in Roswell are on par with area averages, but well below the statewide level. As the largest city in southeastern New Mexico, Roswell functions as the region’s economic hub. However, trends suggest that the city’s economic strength has begun to wane under the pressure of demographic change.

Santa Rosa MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
Demographic patterns in Santa Rosa are strongly impacted by the GEO-administered prison. Census data are skewed by the inclusion of the inmate population; the non-institutionalized population shows sharp declines in the population of children and elderly. On an aggregate level, Santa Rosa’s economy is strong, providing for solid public finances.

Tucumcari MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
Tucumcari has experienced a very sharp decline of its population, from 6,831 in 1990 to 6,026 in 2000 – a 12 percent decline. Changes in educational attainment track an interesting pattern in Tucumcari, generally revealing a polarization in the community. Tucumcari’s economy has been in steady decline for years; development initiatives have brought some stability, but new sources of revenues are needed to provide the community with jobs and funds for public finances.

Digital Media Industry for Dean Christopher Mead, College of Fine Arts of UNM
January 1, 2007
Digital media plays a central role in a number of emerging industries, including motion picture and sound recording industries, software publishing, computer systems design, advertising, and others. By all measures, the field of digital media is posed for significant growth and represents a promising avenue for economic development for New Mexico. (Author: Jeffrey Mitchell)
PDF Version [61.6 K]

The Economic Impact of Nonprofit Organizations in New Mexico
December 31, 2006
This is the first time that a Report has assembled research on the nonprofit sector and its economic contributions to New Mexico. In the recent past, we saw a similar study pertaining solely to the arts and cultural industries in Santa Fe County. The findings of that study, prepared by the Bureau of Business of Economic Research at UNM, persuaded us that a similar study on the economic impact of the statewide nonprofit sector would be illuminating. (Author: Jeffrey Mitchell)
PDF Version [496.8 K]

Chama MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
July 1, 2006
Between 1990 and 2000 Chama’s population increased from 1,048 to 1,199 persons. The 14.4% increase was slightly below the statewide increase of 20%. Data is not available for the town for the period since the 2000 Census; the best estimate is for Rio Arriba County, which saw a population decline of 0.6% between 2000 and 2005. Per capita incomes in Chama are only slightly below the statewide average and for a rural area in New Mexico relatively high.

Springer MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
July 1, 2006
According US Census Bureau data, Springer’s population remained almost unchanged between 1990 and 2000, settling at 1,285 in 2000. Businesses in Springer face a great challenge, as local residents tend to spend far more of their income outside the community than others bring to Springer.

Clayton MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2006
Clayton’s population grew very slightly during the period 1990-2000, consistent with the broader tends in Union County and northeastern New Mexico as a whole. In 2002, Clayton had a modest surplus of $7 million taxable gross receipts, providing for reasonably solid town finances.

Las Vegas MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2006
By both U.S. and New Mexican standards, Las Vegas’ population is stable and young. Per capita incomes in Las Vegas are very low ($12,619 vs. $17,261 for New Mexico); per capita income in the town of Las Vegas, the seat of San Miguel County, is below that of the County ($13,268). Las Vegas has a large surplus in taxable gross receipts, providing for solid town finances.

Raton MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2006
Raton’s population is stagnant (slight decline in population between 1990-2000). Per capita incomes in Raton are low ($14,224 vs. $17,261 for New Mexico, comparable to Colfax as a whole) and unemployment rates are very high (7.2% vs. 3.3% for New Mexico in 2000). A large share of Raton’s households depend on fixed income (38.9% receive Social Security benefits vs. 25.5% for New Mexico, 23.5% receive retirement benefits vs. 17.4% for New Mexico). Overall, Raton has a strong surplus in taxable gross receipts, providing for solid town finances.

The Management and Future Federal Investment in New Mexcio
April 28, 2005
PDF Version [1.7 MB]

Education

New Mexico Sun Path Program Return on Investment
September 1, 2017

Analysis of UNM's Faculty Worklife Survey
February 13, 2015
In the fall of 2013, UNM implemented a Faculty Worklife Survey at UNM Main Campus, developed by Academic Leader ship Fellow Melissa Bokovoy and Associate Provost for Faculty Development Virginia Scharff, based on a similar survey designed by the University of Wisconsin and implemented there and at a number of other universities across the country. The UNM survey responses were compiled and the results made available on a limited basis last year. Several months after the survey was completed, UNM Bureau of Business and Economic Research was asked to analyze the survey results. Having had a leadership role in a Legislative Task Force on Work - Life Balance, BBER was enthusiastic about this assignment. The survey was well designed and comprehensive in its exploration of issues.
PDF Version [799.0 K]

Economic Impact of the School for Advanced Research on the Economies of Santa Fe County and NM
January 1, 2013
The University of New Mexico Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) was commissioned by the School for Advanced Research (SAR) to estimate the economic impact of SAR on the economies of Santa Fe County and the State of New Mexico for the fiscal year 2011-2012 (FY12).
PDF Version [692.5 K]

The Economic Impact of Dona Ana Community College in Dona Ana County in FY11
May 1, 2012
Dona Ana Community College (DACC) commissioned University of New Mexico?s Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) to analyze the economic impact of its operation on the Dona Ana County economy for fiscal year (FY) 2011. BBER estimated conventional economic impacts of DACC using IMPLAN, an economic impact analysis model. The economic impacts of DACC arise from several sources including college operation and capital spending, out-of-county student spending and the additional earnings of DACC graduates and noncredit students who earn higher wages and salaries because of their education and who remain in the county after completion of their degree, certificate and training. (Doleswar Bhandari, Ph.D.)
PDF Version [434.9 K]

Central New Mexico Education Needs Assessment
July 1, 2011
The objective of BBER's research is to identify areas (issues and places) where United Way's community investments will have the greatest impact in improving educational outcomes in the four county service area. The focus is on student readiness rather than activities for which school districts are directly responsible. (Authors: Jeffrey Mitchell)
PDF Version [1.1 MB]

Options for Funding Local Library Operations (Including Collections) in New Mexico
April 1, 2010
This is a study of financing options for the operations of local libraries in New Mexico, whether these libraries are run by municipalities, counties, as a cooperative city-county effort, by non-profit organizations, by Native American tribes or by regional authorities as yet to be constituted. Our concern has been with the 93 local libraries that currently comprise the State Library system. We have not considered libraries in public schools, nor those in our colleges and universities, although surely these are important resources to local communities and not just to those who are fortunate enough to be students, staff or teachers/faculty at these institutions. The primary concern is with funding for library operations, by which we understand on-going needs: salaries and benefits for library staff, operations and maintenance of library facilities, utilities and other expenses associated with operations, and, critically, books and media. This is not to deny the importance of adequate facilities, but wonderful facilities are of little worth unless one can keep the doors open, a staff paid and unless one has product, most notably books and media, but also cultural and other programming to draw patrons of all ages. (Authors: Lee Reynis, Molly Bleecker, Sean Petranovich)
PDF Version [711.4 K]

The Economic Impact of the University of New Mexico on the State of New Mexico
December 1, 2007
The University of New Mexico Office of the President commissioned the UNM Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) to conduct a study of the economic impact of the University of New Mexico (UNM) on the economy of New Mexico for the Fiscal year 2007. This report contains the results of the study and outlines the data and methods used to arrive at these results. This study focuses on the economic impact of spending and employment by UNM. The impacts show how the dollars that flow to UNM from out-of-state sources support direct spending on salaries, benefits, and goods and services, and how that spending creates additional economic activity in the state of New Mexico. UNM's expenditures on goods and services create indirect effects as the firms supplying UNM buy supplies from other firms and employ people to produce their products. Part of the salaries of UNM employees and UNM vendors are spent in the community, creating further demand for goods and services and resulting in more people working and additional income. However, this is not the maximum impact from UNM, as the impacts of other factors such as encouraging technology development and contributing to an educated workforce are likely to be substantial even if they are less easily quantified. (Nicholas Potter)
PDF Version [106.4 K]

Status of Nurses in New Mexico
December 1, 2007
The New Mexico Center for Nursing Excellence (NMCNE) was established in 2002 to advocate for nursing resources to meet the healthcare needs of the people of the state. As part of this mission, NMCNE commissioned the Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico to conduct two studies. The first study is an analysis of the current and projected future status of the state?s nursing labor force. The central focus of this study is the supply of qualified RNs in the state. The supply of nurses can be affected through policy whereas the demand of nurses is a result of population forces. (Author: Daren Ruiz)
PDF Version [115.3 K]

Population, Housing, and Education in Lea County: Community Improvement Corporation Report
November 13, 2007
Population, Housing, and Education in Lea County: Report to the Lea County Community Improvement Corporation
PDF Version [2.3 MB]

Employment

Employment Forecasts for Santa Fe County and SF County Service Areas: 2015 to 2030 (Part 2)
September 12, 2014
The Santa Fe County Growth Management Department contracted UNM’s Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) and Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) to forecast Santa Fe County population and employment, respectively. In this report, BBER will forecast employment for 2013 through 2030 for Santa Fe County and the following Santa Fe County service areas: Land Use Regulatory Jurisdiction, Land Use Regulatory Jurisdiction by Growth Management Area, Sustainable Development (SDA-1, SDA-2, SDA-3), Utility/Water Service, Growth Management (El Centro, El Norte, Estancia, Galisteo).
PDF Version [694.1 K]

Employment Forecasts for Santa Fe County and SF County Service Areas: 2015 to 2030 (Part 1)
March 24, 2014
In order to forecast public facility demand and costs to use in the Santa Fe County’s anticipated impact fee ordinance, the Santa Fe County Growth Management Department approached UNM’s Geospatial and Population Studies (GPS) and Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) to forecast Santa Fe County population and employment respectively. GPS and BBER will forecast population and employment for 2015 through 2030 for Santa Fe County and the following Santa Fe County service areas: Santa Fe County Growth Management Areas, Santa Fe County Land Use Regulatory Jurisdiction Areas, Santa Fe County Utility/Water Service Areas, Santa Fe County Sustainable Development Areas.
PDF Version [1.3 MB]

Impacts of the Debt Control Act of 2011 on the NM Economy
December 1, 2012
The Debt Control Act, negotiated by Congress and the President in August 2011, calls for at least a $2.2 trillion reduction in federal government spending through 2021. Although the details have been left resolved pending negotiations to be concluded in November, the Act does necessitate cuts of $917 billion in the first tranche and additional cuts of at least $1.2 trillion to follow. In this brief section, we estimate the potential impacts of these cuts on New Mexico?s economy, using assumptions based on the general terms of a sequestering process that is to go into effect if negotiations fail to offer alternative budgetary outcomes.
PDF Version [34.7 K]

A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the NM Counties
December 1, 2012
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the NM Counties
PDF Version [1.2 MB]

The Economic Impact of SV Economic Development Center on the Bernalillo County Economy
November 1, 2011
The University of New Mexico?s Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) was commissioned by the Rio Grande Community Development Corporation (RGCDC) to estimate the economic impact of businesses affiliated with the South Valley Economic Development Center (SVEDC) on the Bernalillo County economy for Calendar Year 2010. SVEDC-affiliated businesses are defined as businesses that are currently using or have formerly used SVEDC resources. SVEDC current tenants or service recipients: 77 SVEDC graduates: 32 Total beneficiaries: 109 Total business employment impact: 298 jobs Total wages and salary impact: $3.93 million Total business activity impact: $8.97 million (Authors: Doleswar Bhandari)
PDF Version [161.6 K]

Central New Mexico Education Needs Assessment
July 1, 2011
The objective of BBER's research is to identify areas (issues and places) where United Way's community investments will have the greatest impact in improving educational outcomes in the four county service area. The focus is on student readiness rather than activities for which school districts are directly responsible. (Authors: Jeffrey Mitchell)
PDF Version [1.1 MB]

Economic Impact of Los Alamos National Laboratory on Northern New Mexico and the State
March 1, 2011
LANL injected more than $1.4 billion directly into the northern New Mexico economy during FY 2009. These injections provided more than 11,200 direct jobs, nearly $1.1 billion labor income and $1.4 billion economic output to the region. LANL?s expenditures also indirectly supported approximately 9,300 jobs, more than $317 million in labor income and $932 million economic output in this region (Table 3.1). The total economic impact of LANL to the region is approximately 20,531 in employment, $1.4 billion in labor income, and $2.3 billion in economic output. In addition, a total of 3,050 LANL retirees with $140 million in pension benefits are estimated to have supported an additional 821 jobs with $26 million in labor income (Table 4.1). Northern New Mexico consists of the seven counties of Los Alamos, Santa Fe, Rio Arriba, Sandoval, Taos, San Miguel and Mora. (Author: Dolewsar Bhandari, PhD)
PDF Version [204.5 K]

A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
February 1, 2011
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
PDF Version [2.1 MB]

UNM's Science and Technology Corporation: The Impact of Start-up Companies
January 1, 2011
The Science and Technology Corporation (STC) asked the Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) to conduct a study of the economic impact of start-up companies using STC technologies on the economy of New Mexico. BBER conducted a similar analysis in 2004 and is available on the STC website (http://stc.unm.edu/about/metrics.php). This analysis updates the 2004 study and emphasizes the impact of high-tech start-up companies that have had a relationship with STC from 2004 to the present. Of the 16 companies included in the survey, 12 are headquartered in New Mexico. Nevertheless, all companies conduct operations within New Mexico. Table 1 shows the relevant companies along with start-up date and a short company description (Authors: Michael O'Donnell)
PDF Version [224.1 K]

A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the NM Counties
December 1, 2009
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the NM Counties
PDF Version [1.5 MB]

A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
March 1, 2009
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
PDF Version [2.1 MB]

State of the Albuquerque Economy and Forecast for the Albuquerque Economic Roundtable
January 15, 2009
State of the Albuquerque Economy and Forecast for the Albuquerque Economic Roundtable (Lee Reynis)
PDF Version [109.0 K]

Recent Population Dynamics of New Mexico Nurses
July 1, 2008
This study analyzes recent population dynamics of New Mexico nurses also with the license database from NMBON. NMCNE wants to project future nursing shortages and advocate for a commensurate increase in nursing education resources. In order to do so, a sound understanding of the changing nature of the nursing population is needed. This study explores nursing population dynamics in two sections: inflow and outflow. (Author: Daren Ruiz)
PDF Version [147.6 K]

The Economic Impact of the University of New Mexico on the State of New Mexico
December 1, 2007
The University of New Mexico Office of the President commissioned the UNM Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) to conduct a study of the economic impact of the University of New Mexico (UNM) on the economy of New Mexico for the Fiscal year 2007. This report contains the results of the study and outlines the data and methods used to arrive at these results. This study focuses on the economic impact of spending and employment by UNM. The impacts show how the dollars that flow to UNM from out-of-state sources support direct spending on salaries, benefits, and goods and services, and how that spending creates additional economic activity in the state of New Mexico. UNM's expenditures on goods and services create indirect effects as the firms supplying UNM buy supplies from other firms and employ people to produce their products. Part of the salaries of UNM employees and UNM vendors are spent in the community, creating further demand for goods and services and resulting in more people working and additional income. However, this is not the maximum impact from UNM, as the impacts of other factors such as encouraging technology development and contributing to an educated workforce are likely to be substantial even if they are less easily quantified. (Nicholas Potter)
PDF Version [106.4 K]

Population, Housing, and Education in Lea County: Community Improvement Corporation Report
November 13, 2007
Population, Housing, and Education in Lea County: Report to the Lea County Community Improvement Corporation
PDF Version [2.3 MB]

Employer Survey: A Report to the Lea County Community Improvement Corporation (Lea Economy)
November 13, 2007
Survey of Lea County Employers (in connection with the report on The Economy of Lea County and the Larger Region) a Report to the Lea County Community Improvement Corporation
PDF Version [304.5 K]

The Economy of Lea County and the Larger Region: Report to Community Improvement Corporation
November 13, 2007
The Economy of Lea County and the Larger Region: Report to the Lea County Community Improvement Corporation
PDF Version [781.2 K]

2007 Lea County Economic Development Studies
November 13, 2007

Digital Media Industry for Dean Christopher Mead, College of Fine Arts of UNM
January 1, 2007
Digital media plays a central role in a number of emerging industries, including motion picture and sound recording industries, software publishing, computer systems design, advertising, and others. By all measures, the field of digital media is posed for significant growth and represents a promising avenue for economic development for New Mexico. (Author: Jeffrey Mitchell)
PDF Version [61.6 K]

The Economic Impact of Nonprofit Organizations in New Mexico
December 31, 2006
This is the first time that a Report has assembled research on the nonprofit sector and its economic contributions to New Mexico. In the recent past, we saw a similar study pertaining solely to the arts and cultural industries in Santa Fe County. The findings of that study, prepared by the Bureau of Business of Economic Research at UNM, persuaded us that a similar study on the economic impact of the statewide nonprofit sector would be illuminating. (Author: Jeffrey Mitchell)
PDF Version [496.8 K]

Energy

The New Mexico Jobs Project: A Guide to Creating Jobs in Advanced Solar Technology
April 2, 2018
New Mexico’s advanced solar industry is a significant economic opportunity for job growth, having the potential to support an annual average of over 6,800 jobs through 2030. New Mexico can capitalize on this opportunity by bolstering the innovation ecosystem, access to capital, workforce development, value chain, and local market.
PDF Version [8.7 MB]

Update of the Census for Lea County: The Economic Context
November 15, 2015
The Lea County economy had a dazzling run after 2010, but the high oil prices which put the economy into high gear are gone, with the West Texas Intermediate spot oil price back down in the neighborhood of $40 per barrel. Many producers had entered into hedging contracts that guaranteed high prices well into the future, so the collapse of oil prices did not immediately slow production, although rig counts and drilling activity did fall off and the contracts have come due. Lea County in the Permian Basin is a low cost area with abundant reserves. Drilling and other activities over the past few years have increased dramatically the productivity of individual oil reservoirs. In this period of lower prices, the county and the Permian Basin more generally seem to have attracted interest and investment as major companies were pulling out of more costly tight oil plays in North Dakota and elsewhere. Figure ES.1 pretty much captures the changing reality for oil in the Permian Basin and Lea County over the recent past. What distinguishes the Permian is the fact net oil production (from legacy wells as well as new) has continued to increase. Gas production is also up slightly, although prices for natural gas have continued to fall, with the Henry Hub spot price now in the neighborhood of $2.00 per MMBTU.
PDF Version [741.8 K]

Forecasting New Mexico's Oil & Gas Revenues: The Impact of Technology Change
April 17, 2012
Recent technological improvements in horizontal drilling technologies, in particular the development of a steerable GPS-guided bit, have altered New Mexico's oil industry. As a result, patterns in oil revenues are changing and the revenue estimation process used in recent years by the New Mexico State Land Office (SLO) is not performing as reliably as it once did. The SLO has contracted the University of New Mexico's Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) to assist in identifying approaches and methods of forecasting SLO revenues from oil and gas renewable sources (i.e., bonus payments) and non-renewable sources (royalty income). (Authors: Gwendolyn Aldrich)
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Oil and Gas Revenue Forecasting: New Mexico State Land Office
July 1, 2011
The UNM Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) was requested by the State Land Office to explore alternative methodologies for estimating oil and gas renewable revenue sources (bonus payments, rents and interest earnings) as well as non-renewable sources (royalty income).
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Health Care

Economic and Fiscal Impacts of the Medicaid Expansion in NM Since Implementation in 2014
May 25, 2016
This brief updates a previous analysis performed by UNM BBER on the likely impacts of Medicaid Expansion in New Mexico. Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) as enacted on March 23, 2010, states were required to extend Medicaid coverage to low-income adults under 65 years old with incomes up to 133% percent of the poverty level (138% after income disregards). However, the Supreme Court held that the federal government cannot withhold current Medicaid funding should a state decide to opt out of the Medicaid Expansion. When the previous report was written, New Mexico had not decided whether to implement the Medicaid Expansion. Subsequently, in January 2013, Governor Susana Martinez announced her decision to have New Mexico participate in the expansion. This brief examines: 1. The additional flow of federal Medicaid dollars to the State of New Mexico since January 2014 as more and more eligible adults signed up to participate in the Medicaid Expansion and provides projections for the program through State Fiscal Year 2021. The projections through FY 2020 are based on enrollment and cost projections by the NM Health and Human Services Department (HSD) in December 2015. Details are in many cases informed by HSD projections that were made in conjunction with their September submission for the 2017 Budget cycle. 2. Related to the ACA and the Medicaid Expansion, changes in federal and state programs designed to cover uncompensated care. 3. The emerging economic data that reflect the impacts of the Medicaid Expansion to date. 4. An analysis of the economic impacts on New Mexico of the Medicaid Expansion (including new job creation) since implementation in 2014 and as may be expected between now and 2021. 5. Actual and anticipated impacts of the Medicaid Expansion on the State General Fund.
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Cost-Benefit Analysis of Increasing Breastfeeding Rate in New Mexico
July 1, 2014
BBER conducted an in-depth analysis of childhood asthma and obesity using the National Survey of Children Health (NSCH), as well as cohort data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (LSLy79) conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. To estimate the cost of these illnesses, BBER used 2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys (MEPS) data. (Authors: Doleswar Bhandari, Ph.D., Naresh Nepal, Ph.D.
PDF Version [2.7 MB]

Economic and Fiscal Impacts of the Proposed Medical Expansion in New Mexico
October 31, 2012
This brief analyzes the economic and fiscal impacts of the Medicaid Expansion in New Mexico. Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) as enacted on March 23, 2010, states were required to extend Medicaid coverage to low-income adults under 65 years old with incomes up to 133% percent of the poverty level (138% after income disregards). However, the Supreme Court held that the federal government cannot withhold current Medicaid funding should a state decide to opt out of the Medicaid Expansion. At this time, New Mexico has not decided whether to implement the Medicaid Expansion. (Authors: Lee Reynis)
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Recent Population Dynamics of New Mexico Nurses
July 1, 2008
This study analyzes recent population dynamics of New Mexico nurses also with the license database from NMBON. NMCNE wants to project future nursing shortages and advocate for a commensurate increase in nursing education resources. In order to do so, a sound understanding of the changing nature of the nursing population is needed. This study explores nursing population dynamics in two sections: inflow and outflow. (Author: Daren Ruiz)
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Status of Nurses in New Mexico
December 1, 2007
The New Mexico Center for Nursing Excellence (NMCNE) was established in 2002 to advocate for nursing resources to meet the healthcare needs of the people of the state. As part of this mission, NMCNE commissioned the Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico to conduct two studies. The first study is an analysis of the current and projected future status of the state?s nursing labor force. The central focus of this study is the supply of qualified RNs in the state. The supply of nurses can be affected through policy whereas the demand of nurses is a result of population forces. (Author: Daren Ruiz)
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Comparative Analysis of Reform Options for Extending Health Care Coverage in New Mexico
July 31, 2007
The Health Coverage for New Mexicans Committee requested that Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. estimate the cost of the current health care system in New Mexico and the relative cost of three alternative strategies to ensure that all New Mexicans become and remain insured. To develop estimates that would help the Committee compare reform models on the same basis, we needed to develop relatively precise specifications for key components of the models. (Deborah Chollet, Su Liu, Beth Gillian, Paul Biderman, Lee Reynis, William Wiese)
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Housing

Apartment Survey Mid-April 2017
July 20, 2017
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico conducted a survey of apartment properties in communities across the State for the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority (MFA). Unit count, vacancy and rent data for mid-April, along with the year the structure was built, were requested for apartment complexes with five or more units.
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Apartment Survey Mid-April 2016: NM Mortgage Finance Authority
August 19, 2016
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico conducted a survey of apartment properties in communities across the State for the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority (MFA). Unit count, vacancy and rent data for mid-April, along with the year the structure was built, were requested for apartment complexes with five or more units.
PDF Version [706.1 K]

NM Mortgage Finance Authority Apartment Survey, 2015
August 18, 2015
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico conducted a survey of apartment properties in communities across the State for the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority (MFA). The survey was undertaken in May 2015 with non-response follow-up extending into late July. Unit count, vacancy and rent data for mid-May, along with the year the structure was built, were requested for apartment complexes with five or more units. The goal was to provide MFA with current market information to enhance the organization’s databases. This is part of a continuing BBER effort on behalf of MFA and was the seventh survey in as many years.
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NM Mortgage Finance Authority Apartment Survey, 2014
May 15, 2014
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico conducted a survey of apartment properties in communities across the State for the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority (MFA). The survey was undertaken in May 2014, with non-response follow-up extending into mid-July. Unit count, vacancy and rent data for mid-May, along with the year the structure was built, were requested for apartment complexes with five or more units. The goal was to provide MFA with current market information to enhance the organization’s databases. This is part of a continuing BBER effort on behalf of MFA and was the sixth survey in as many years.
PDF Version [395.4 K]

NM Mortgage Finance Authority Apartment Survey, 2013
May 15, 2013
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico conducted a survey of apartment properties in communities across the State for the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority (MFA). The goal was to provide MFA with current market information to enhance the organization?s databases. This is part of a continuing BBER effort on behalf of MFA and was the fifth survey in as many years. (Author: Suzan Reagan)
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NM Mortgage Finance Authority Apartment Survey, 2012
May 15, 2012
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico conducted a survey of apartment properties in communities across the State for the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority (MFA). The goal was to provide MFA with current market information to enhance the organization?s databases. This is part of a continuing BBER effort on behalf of MFA and was the fifth survey in as many years. (Author: Suzan Reagan)
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NM Mortgage Finance Authority Apartment Survey, 2011
August 1, 2011
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico conducted a survey of apartment properties in communities across the State for the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority (MFA). The goal was to provide MFA with current market information to enhance the organization?s databases. This is part of a continuing BBER effort on behalf of MFA and was the fifth survey in as many years. (Author: Suzan Reagan)
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The Market for Affordable Housing in Taos, New Mexico
August 1, 2010
This study documents the extent to which home owner ship is beyond the means of households with permanent residence in Taos County. During the 2006-2010 (first quarter) study period, only four percent of housing units sold in the county would have been affordable to the one-third of full-time households with the lowest incomes; most of these housing units were condominiums. From the opposite perspective, fewer than 15 percent of full -time households could afford the median price of a home sold in Taos County during the period. As we narrow our focus to households who depend on local employment for their income, the mismatch becomes even more severe. Fewer than five percent of working households could afford the median price of a home in Taos County during the four-year period. (Authors: Jeffrey Mitchell, Michael O'Donnell)
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NM Mortgage Finance Authority Apartment Survey, 2010
May 1, 2010
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico conducted a survey of apartment properties in communities across the State for the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority (MFA). The goal was to provide MFA with current market information to enhance the organization's databases. This is part of a continuing BBER effort on behalf of MFA and was the fifth survey in as many years. (Author: Suzan Reagan)
PDF Version [313.8 K]

NM Mortgage Finance Authority Apartment Survey, 2009
May 1, 2009
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico conducted a survey of apartment properties in communities across the State for the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority (MFA). The goal was to provide MFA with current market information to enhance the organization's databases. This is part of a continuing BBER effort on behalf of MFA and was the fifth survey in as many years. (Author: Suzan Reagan)
PDF Version [337.5 K]

Income

Analysis of UNM's Faculty Worklife Survey
February 13, 2015
In the fall of 2013, UNM implemented a Faculty Worklife Survey at UNM Main Campus, developed by Academic Leader ship Fellow Melissa Bokovoy and Associate Provost for Faculty Development Virginia Scharff, based on a similar survey designed by the University of Wisconsin and implemented there and at a number of other universities across the country. The UNM survey responses were compiled and the results made available on a limited basis last year. Several months after the survey was completed, UNM Bureau of Business and Economic Research was asked to analyze the survey results. Having had a leadership role in a Legislative Task Force on Work - Life Balance, BBER was enthusiastic about this assignment. The survey was well designed and comprehensive in its exploration of issues.
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Economic Impact of Los Alamos National Laboratory on Northern New Mexico and the State
March 1, 2011
LANL injected more than $1.4 billion directly into the northern New Mexico economy during FY 2009. These injections provided more than 11,200 direct jobs, nearly $1.1 billion labor income and $1.4 billion economic output to the region. LANL?s expenditures also indirectly supported approximately 9,300 jobs, more than $317 million in labor income and $932 million economic output in this region (Table 3.1). The total economic impact of LANL to the region is approximately 20,531 in employment, $1.4 billion in labor income, and $2.3 billion in economic output. In addition, a total of 3,050 LANL retirees with $140 million in pension benefits are estimated to have supported an additional 821 jobs with $26 million in labor income (Table 4.1). Northern New Mexico consists of the seven counties of Los Alamos, Santa Fe, Rio Arriba, Sandoval, Taos, San Miguel and Mora. (Author: Dolewsar Bhandari, PhD)
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An Assessment of the San Miguel County Economy
August 1, 2010
The growth of San Miguel County population has lagged behind the rate for the state of NM, and this pattern is projected to continue during the coming years. Incomes in San Miguel County are about 20% lower than in other parts of the state. (Authors: Jeffrey Mitchell)
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A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the NM Counties
December 1, 2009
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the NM Counties
PDF Version [1.5 MB]

A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
March 1, 2009
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
PDF Version [2.1 MB]

Status of Nurses in New Mexico
December 1, 2007
The New Mexico Center for Nursing Excellence (NMCNE) was established in 2002 to advocate for nursing resources to meet the healthcare needs of the people of the state. As part of this mission, NMCNE commissioned the Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico to conduct two studies. The first study is an analysis of the current and projected future status of the state?s nursing labor force. The central focus of this study is the supply of qualified RNs in the state. The supply of nurses can be affected through policy whereas the demand of nurses is a result of population forces. (Author: Daren Ruiz)
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MainStreet Studies

Barelas MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
June 1, 2015
The history of Barelas is closely tied to the history of transportation in the area. Originally settled as the private estancia of Pedro Varela, the community was established as an official settlement by the Spanish government in 1662. The original settlement boundaries included an essential river crossing along the Camino Real – where now stands the bridge across the Rio Grande on Bridge Boulevard. Growth of the community was slow, with just 350 residents according to the 1880 census and the economy of the community was primarily agricultural until the coming of the railroad in the 1880’s. At the time, Albuquerque was a mile and a half from the train station, whereas Barelas was quite close. Barelas’ location just south of New Town and just west of the rail yard lead to Barelas’s boom years, as the Barelas’ economy pivoted from agriculture to railroad related industries and Barelas’ boom years began. By 1900 Barelas’ population was up to 1200. In 1891, Barelas was incorporated into Albuquerque, ending its era as a self-standing village. Until 1937 Route 66 ran along 4th Street, Bridge Boulevard and Isleta – providing an important local and tourist base for commercial development along 4th Street – where local residents could find services including grocery stores, drug stores, etc. The re-routing of Route 66 along Central Avenue in 1937, the supplanting of US 85 with I-25 as the major north-south route through Albuquerque in the 1950’s further decreased outside traffic through the area, and was a blow to the businesses along the corridor. The final blow to the 4th Street businesses was the converting of 4th Street into the Civic plaza in 1974, resulting in the total loss of 4th Street as even a secondary artery through the city. It was also in the early 1970’s that the Santa Fe Railway shops closed, eliminating 1500 jobs from Barelas and negatively affecting the ability of the Barelas community to support 4th Street businesses . As the Barelas business community along 4th street struggled and closed in the ‘70’s, Barelas’ residents looked to the South Valley Bridge corridor for their needs – until this business district too hit hard times with the widening of Bridge from two lanes to four – the construction process, razing of buildings, and resulting speeding up of traffic had deleterious effects on business in the area.

Harding County MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
June 1, 2015
Harding County MainStreet runs the 19 mile stretch of the Fronterra Del Llano Scenic Byway (Highway 39) from the southern edge of Mosquero to the northern edge of Roy. Harding County is the entryway to the Llano Estacado. The first written account of the area came from Coronado’s 1540 expedition in which he wrote about the area’s potential as grazing lands. Traditionally the territory of the Apache, Comanche, and Kiowa, no Spanish or Mexican land grants were recorded in the county, however, Hispanic settlement in the area dates at least as far back as the Mexican territorial era. Anglo settlement came to the area with the Homestead Act of 1862. In 1901 the Dawson Coal Company was founded and by 1902, a rail spur was completed between Tucumcari and the new coal mines, running through Roy, Solano and Mosquero. With the closure of the mines in Dawson in 1950, the rail spur was discontinued. Harding County has been losing population ever since.

South Valley MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
June 1, 2015
The South Valley was founded as the Atrisco Merced in 1692 and comprised of several small villages including Atrisco, Arenal, Los Padillas and Armijo, among others. The plazas of these historic settlements have lost their centrality and are little known except to long-time residents. As was true for much of north and central New Mexico, the local economy was dominated by agriculture into the early to mid- 20th century with the increased importance of wage-labor in the New Mexico economy. The area was a major regional producer of agricultural goods – in particular sheep and wool products with as many as 70 registered looms once recorded in the Valley. The South Valley MainStreet district runs along a thoroughfare that has been in use since at least the 1500’s as the Camino Real. The bridge of Bridge Boulevard runs above the original river ford on the Camino Real. In the late 1930’s Route 66 was realigned to follow what is now Central Avenue. With the development of the interstates and growth in the Northeast quadrant of Albuquerque, South Valley businesses began to decline. The expansion of Bridge Boulevard to four lanes in the 1980’s further hurt the economic corridor on Bridge with the speeding up of traffic and the razing of old buildings and closure of local businesses during and after construction.

Truth or Consequences MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
June 1, 2015
The Truth or Consequences MainStreet District encompasses a large area along Main St. and Marr Ave to the North and South and the Rio Grande River and Main St. to the East and West respectively. Located right along I-25, nearly equidistant from Albuquerque and El Paso, Truth or Consequences was originally within the home territory of the Chehene Apache, the easternmost band of the Chiricahua Apache. The Apache were forcibly removed in the late 1800’s. Efforts at permanent settlement by the Spanish community didn’t occur until the latter half of the 1800’s and came in fits and starts until early 1900’s with the construction of Elephant Butte Dam. Since the community’s incorporation as Hot Springs in 1916, health-related tourism has been a central industry to the development of the community. Once called ‘The City of Health’, Truth or Consequences took advantage of the health tourism industry in New Mexico in the ‘20’s, ‘30’s and ‘40’s and is said to have been home to over 40 hot springs hotels prior to World War II. Health tourism declined after World War II and the local economy began to decline. The interest among retirees seeking low cost of living and a temperate climate continued through the 1980’s. The ‘90’s saw interest in the town by artists and other creative and counter-culture types and some efforts at revitalization but out-migration continues to be a problem.

Zuni MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
June 1, 2014
Located in the Northwestern region of New Mexico, the Zuni Pueblo is located approximately 150 miles west of Albuquerque and roughly 35 miles south of Gallup. The Reservation covers over 418,000 acres and lies on the western border of New Mexico and the eastern border of Arizona. The predominately Native American community is comprised primarily of people who identify as belonging to the Zuni (A:shiwi) tribe. The Zuni people have inhabited the Southwest for thousands of years and have traditions deeply rooted in agriculture, art, and jewelry making. Due to its relative geographic isolation, the Zuni tribe has maintained a very unique language that is still spoken today. (Authors: Dr. Lee Reynis, Gillian Joyce, Ashley Hooper, Mary Louise Gucik, Daren Ruiz)

Belen MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
March 1, 2014
The City of Belen, established in 1741, is located in south central Valencia County in the valley on the west side of the Rio Grande River. The Belen MainStreet District is displayed on Map 1, which may be found in the Appendix.The District within the main population and commercial center of the City of Belen and is bounded by Main Street on the west, Reinken on the North, the railroad tracks on the east, and Baca on much of the South. As can be seen on the map, City boundaries expand from this central area up to the northwest through the Sausal area with shoe string annexations that include major retail, like Walmart, and attach a large area on both sides of I-25 that is the southern portion of the planned Rancho Cielo development. On the west, the City limits have been drawn to include the airport. On the south, the City expands along the railroad tracks into the Pueblitos area, and to the east the City expands in a corridor to the Rio Grande River. Across the river is the major development of Rio Communities.
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Lovington MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
February 1, 2009
Lovington’s population growth has been essentially flat since at least 1990, but the proportionately large share of youth suggests some possibility of relief, especially in labor markets, in coming years. However, low levels of educational achievement and an extreme lack of housing will continue to present challenges.

Deming MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
March 1, 2008
Lovington’s population growth has been essentially flat since at least 1990, but the proportionately large share of youth suggests some possibility of relief, especially in labor markets, in coming years. However, low levels of educational achievement and an extreme lack of housing will continue to present challenges.

Las Cruces MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
March 1, 2008
Lovington’s population growth has been essentially flat since at least 1990, but the proportionately large share of youth suggests some possibility of relief, especially in labor markets, in coming years. However, low levels of educational achievement and an extreme lack of housing will continue to present challenges.

Silver City MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
February 1, 2008
Considering the long term impact of the decline of copper mining in southwestern New Mexico, Silver City's economy is very stable, with significant advantages as a regional retail, service, and educational center and in its growing hospitality and related real estate sectors.
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Corrales MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
November 1, 2007
Corrales is second only to Los Alamos as the wealthiest community in New Mexico. According to estimates by ESRI®, based on 2000 census data, per capita income in Corrales was $42,651, nearly twice the statewide average. The household median income is estimated at $80,344; the average income is skewed slightly higher.

Grants MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
November 1, 2007
Incomes in Grants are low, but on par with those of smaller communities in New Mexico. Per capita income is estimated at $17,312 (compared to $21,756 for the state); median household income is $35,390 ($41,539 for the state). Grants has a well balanced economy, though incomes are somewhat low. The city has a roughly equal number of jobs and employed residents (3,382 jobs and 3,440 employed), though about one quarter of employed residents work outside the city with a proportionate number of local jobs filled by residents of other areas.

Bernalillo MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
October 1, 2007
Located less than 20 miles from downtown Albuquerque, Bernalillo is predominately and increasingly a residential community. In 2006, about 3,400 residents of Bernalillo were employed, while reported employment by Bernalillo-based businesses was about 1,900. Thus, nearly half of Bernalillo's workforce was employed outside the town. Yet, Bernalillo also has a remarkably diverse economy, including a strong manufacturing sector and a service hub along key transportation arteries. On a net basis, Bernalillo retains an estimated 85 percent of locally-originated receipts, resulting in a leakage of about $20 million in receipts per year.

Clovis MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
May 1, 2007
Clovis serves as a principal center for the NMEP region. However, given the advantages of its situation and the proximity of major employers such as Cannon Air Force Base (AFB), the local economy under-performs with respect to expectations. As a whole, the pull factor for Clovis’ economy in 2005 was 95 percent, resulting in leakages of about $36 million (with respect to the state of New Mexico).

Artesia MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
Artesia’s population is relatively stable, though slowly growing; the rate of growth of the Hispanic population far exceeds that of the White/non-Hispanic population; levels of educational attainment are very low. For a small community of 11,000, Artesia’s economy is diverse. The economy has strong ‘base industries’ (including oil & gas, utilities, construction, wholesale trade, transportation, federal government) that bring dollars into the community and strong retail and service sectors that recycle these dollars among local businesses.

Carlsbad MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
Carlsbad’s population is relatively stable, though slowly growing; there is a small decline in the senior population which is contrary to the graying pattern seen in other parts of the southeast New Mexico (SE NM) region. Educational attainment has shown some improvement at the grade school level, but this has not yet translated into significant gains in post-secondary education. On a net basis, economic leakages (money spent by local residents outside the community) exceed inflows (residents of other communities spending money in Carlsbad) by about 10 percent, resulting in a net leakage of about $57 million in 2005.

Hobbs MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
Demographic patterns in Hobbs are troubling – the population is declining and becoming much older, the ethnic transition is very rapid, and levels of educational attainment are very low and not improving. Hobbs’ economy is driven by the oil and gas economy, and is therefore subject to wide swings of boom and bust. When the market for the resources is strong, wealth is generated, but complexities hinder the distribution of this wealth to the labor force and make long term planning and investment problematic.

Portales MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
Portales’ population in 2000 was 10,848, up slightly from 1990. The age structure is somewhat more favorable than in other parts of the New Mexico Eastern Plains region (NMEP), at least in terms of economic prospects. Portales is a university town that also serves as the seat and service center for Roosevelt County and its agricultural economy. In terms of taxable gross receipts, Portales stands in a negative and declining balance with respect to New Mexico as a whole, but this outflow of about $35 million (2005) is at least partially offset by public sector and nontaxable revenues generated by ENMU.

Roswell MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
As in other parts of Southeastern New Mexico, New Mexico as a whole, and indeed throughout the U.S., the trend in Roswell is toward an older and more Hispanic population. Incomes in Roswell are on par with area averages, but well below the statewide level. As the largest city in southeastern New Mexico, Roswell functions as the region’s economic hub. However, trends suggest that the city’s economic strength has begun to wane under the pressure of demographic change.

Santa Rosa MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
Demographic patterns in Santa Rosa are strongly impacted by the GEO-administered prison. Census data are skewed by the inclusion of the inmate population; the non-institutionalized population shows sharp declines in the population of children and elderly. On an aggregate level, Santa Rosa’s economy is strong, providing for solid public finances.

Tucumcari MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2007
Tucumcari has experienced a very sharp decline of its population, from 6,831 in 1990 to 6,026 in 2000 – a 12 percent decline. Changes in educational attainment track an interesting pattern in Tucumcari, generally revealing a polarization in the community. Tucumcari’s economy has been in steady decline for years; development initiatives have brought some stability, but new sources of revenues are needed to provide the community with jobs and funds for public finances.

Chama MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
July 1, 2006
Between 1990 and 2000 Chama’s population increased from 1,048 to 1,199 persons. The 14.4% increase was slightly below the statewide increase of 20%. Data is not available for the town for the period since the 2000 Census; the best estimate is for Rio Arriba County, which saw a population decline of 0.6% between 2000 and 2005. Per capita incomes in Chama are only slightly below the statewide average and for a rural area in New Mexico relatively high.

Springer MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
July 1, 2006
According US Census Bureau data, Springer’s population remained almost unchanged between 1990 and 2000, settling at 1,285 in 2000. Businesses in Springer face a great challenge, as local residents tend to spend far more of their income outside the community than others bring to Springer.

Clayton MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2006
Clayton’s population grew very slightly during the period 1990-2000, consistent with the broader tends in Union County and northeastern New Mexico as a whole. In 2002, Clayton had a modest surplus of $7 million taxable gross receipts, providing for reasonably solid town finances.

Gallup MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2006
Gallup’s population is young but slowly growing (5% increase population between 1990-2000). Per capita incomes in Gallup are on par with the State average, and above that of most other New Mexican communities outside of Albuquerque and Santa Fe. Incomes in Gallup are more than twice those of other parts of McKinley County – per capita incomes in Gallup in 2000 were $15,789, compared to only $7,682 in other parts of the County. Gallup has a huge surplus in taxable gross receipts, nearly $230 million in 2002, providing for solid city finances and opportunities for community investment. However, the data suggests a long-term erosion of Gallup’s strong market position.

Las Vegas MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2006
By both U.S. and New Mexican standards, Las Vegas’ population is stable and young. Per capita incomes in Las Vegas are very low ($12,619 vs. $17,261 for New Mexico); per capita income in the town of Las Vegas, the seat of San Miguel County, is below that of the County ($13,268). Las Vegas has a large surplus in taxable gross receipts, providing for solid town finances.

Raton MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
April 1, 2006
Raton’s population is stagnant (slight decline in population between 1990-2000). Per capita incomes in Raton are low ($14,224 vs. $17,261 for New Mexico, comparable to Colfax as a whole) and unemployment rates are very high (7.2% vs. 3.3% for New Mexico in 2000). A large share of Raton’s households depend on fixed income (38.9% receive Social Security benefits vs. 25.5% for New Mexico, 23.5% receive retirement benefits vs. 17.4% for New Mexico). Overall, Raton has a strong surplus in taxable gross receipts, providing for solid town finances.

Miscellaneous

Apartment Survey Mid-April 2016: NM Mortgage Finance Authority
August 19, 2016
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico conducted a survey of apartment properties in communities across the State for the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority (MFA). Unit count, vacancy and rent data for mid-April, along with the year the structure was built, were requested for apartment complexes with five or more units.
PDF Version [706.1 K]

Broadband Subscription and Internet Use in New Mexico
June 1, 2013
The New Mexico Department of Information Technology?s (DoIT) Broadband Program, funded by the Broadband Technology Opportunity Program (BTOP), serves as a coordinating agency of statewide initiatives to broaden the availability and promote adoption of high- speed internet in New Mexico. As part of this effort, DoIT has contracted UNM?s Bureau of Business & Economic Research (BBER) to provide an analysis of patterns and barriers to broadband adoption in New Mexico. This report summarizes the results of this analysis. The report draws upon a survey of 1,000 households across New Mexico. The survey, conducted in December 2012, queried home internet access and internet technologies; barriers to home access; patterns of internet use both in the home and outside the home; digital literacy and access to resources to enhance digital literacy. The survey also collected a wide range of socioeconomic and demographic information, including geographical location, from the survey participants.
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A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
December 1, 2012
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
PDF Version [1.8 MB]

Impacts of the Debt Control Act of 2011 on the NM Economy
December 1, 2012
The Debt Control Act, negotiated by Congress and the President in August 2011, calls for at least a $2.2 trillion reduction in federal government spending through 2021. Although the details have been left resolved pending negotiations to be concluded in November, the Act does necessitate cuts of $917 billion in the first tranche and additional cuts of at least $1.2 trillion to follow. In this brief section, we estimate the potential impacts of these cuts on New Mexico?s economy, using assumptions based on the general terms of a sequestering process that is to go into effect if negotiations fail to offer alternative budgetary outcomes.
PDF Version [34.7 K]

Air Force Research Laboratory Kirtland AFB, NM; FY09 Economic Impact Assessment
May 1, 2012
The University of New Mexico's Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) was commissioned by the New Mexico Institute of Mining and technology, an Air Force Research Laboratory partnership intermediary, to estimate the economic impact of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) at Kirtland Air Force Base (Kirtland AFB) on the economy of New Mexico for Federal Fiscal Year 2009 (FY09). This analysis covers the economic impact of the Directed Energy Directorate (RD) and the Space Vehicles Directorate (RV), hereafter referred to as AFRL, and which constitute the Phillips Research Site (PRS) at Kirtland in Albuquerque, NM. (Authors: Doleswar Bhandari, Jessica Bloom)
PDF Version [273.1 K]

Commuter Rail Transit Price Elasticity of Demand: An Assessment for the New Mexico Rail Runner
September 12, 2011
The New Mexico Rail Runner (NMRX) has been in operation since July 17, 2006. Current annual operating expenses for NMRX are approximately $24 million. Although the federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) program provided NMRX with $6.8 million in annual funding in FY10, these Funds were reduced by $1.2 million in FY12. CMAQ restrictions will phase eliminate these funds by FY13. Due to the need to attain a balanced budget, the Rio Metro Regional Transit District (RMRTD) is exploring a variety of options for raising revenues and reducing operating expenses, including advertising, exploring other state and federal funding sources, schedule changes, fare increases, and using buses for less popular routes. The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) was asked to assess the potential effects of an increase in fares?and in particular the impact of fare increases on ridership ? by conducting a literature review and examining NMRX?s peer transit systems.
PDF Version [263.4 K]

NM Mortgage Finance Authority Apartment Survey, 2011
August 1, 2011
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico conducted a survey of apartment properties in communities across the State for the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority (MFA). The goal was to provide MFA with current market information to enhance the organization?s databases. This is part of a continuing BBER effort on behalf of MFA and was the fifth survey in as many years. (Author: Suzan Reagan)
PDF Version [171.6 K]

NM Mortgage Finance Authority Apartment Survey, 2009
May 1, 2009
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico conducted a survey of apartment properties in communities across the State for the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority (MFA). The goal was to provide MFA with current market information to enhance the organization's databases. This is part of a continuing BBER effort on behalf of MFA and was the fifth survey in as many years. (Author: Suzan Reagan)
PDF Version [337.5 K]

Estimated Economic Impacts of the Buckman Direct Diversion Project
January 30, 2009
The Buckman Direct Diversion (BDD) Project will provide an additional source of water supply for the Santa Fe area. It includes a diversion structure on the Rio Grande, pumping stations, pipelines and a new water treatment plant. The City of Santa Fe and Santa Fe County, with Las Campanas as a limited partner, are building the BDD to access San Juan-Chama Project water contracted to the City and the County and water associated with native Rio Grande water rights. The BDD water treatment plant will prepare the City and County water for use by residents and businesses. The design-build contractor is a joint venture between CH2M Hill and Western Summit Constructors. Construction began in September 2008 and will continue until the project is operational, expected before the summer in 2011. The project budget for the fiscal years commencing July 1, 2008, through project construction completion is $216 million. Prior to FY 08, professional services for planning, conceptual and preliminary design, compliance with federal environmental law, acquisition of state and federal permits, and competitive procurement of the design and build contractor cost an additional $13 million. (Authors: Lee Reynis, Dolewsar Bhandari, Andrew Webb)
PDF Version [314.3 K]

South Valley Incorporation Feasibility
October 1, 2008
The area proposed for South Valley incorporation is a vast area on the City of Albuquerque's southwestern flank with a population conservatively estimated to be just over 50,000 in 2007.1 While the South Valley incorporation area accounts for just under half (45%) of the population in unincorporated Bernalillo County and was almost 8% of the county's total population in 2000, as estimated by the Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER), the area is under served in terms of private sector economic activity. In 2006, average monthly private wage and salary employment in the South Valley area amounted to 7,700, or 2.9%, of the average for all of Bernalillo County. Determining the financial feasibility of a South Valley municipality requires developing estimates of the revenues that might be raised, and this in turn requires a careful reading of New Mexico statutes to see what the City may be entitled to and what authority it has under State law, as well as estimating the tax bases and the levels of activity against which fees and charges for services will be assessed. Of course, it is also critical to determine how much it will cost to provide various municipal services to the South Valley. In this exercise, it is useful to look at other municipalities, the revenues they raise, the amounts spent on providing services -- as well as taking a very careful look at service provision to the South Valley by Bernalillo County and any associated revenues.
PDF Version [1.1 MB]

The Transition from Incorporated Community to Municipality in the South Valley
June 1, 2008
The South Valley is a diverse area at the heart of the rural-urban interface in the Middle Rio Grande Valley. The proposition of forming a municipality in this area is full of possibility and rife with challenges. This report is an attempt to begin fleshing out the nature of what the community may face should it choose to incorporate. Part One is a historical review of incorporation in New Mexico and the Southwestern United States. Part Two is an examination of geographical, social and political issues unique to the South Valley study area. Part Three is an examination of possible partnerships that will be needed for the success of a new municipality. (Author: Joshua M. Akers)
PDF Version [174.1 K]

Population, Housing, and Education in Lea County: Community Improvement Corporation Report
November 13, 2007
Population, Housing, and Education in Lea County: Report to the Lea County Community Improvement Corporation
PDF Version [2.3 MB]

Comparative Analysis of Reform Options for Extending Health Care Coverage in New Mexico
July 31, 2007
The Health Coverage for New Mexicans Committee requested that Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. estimate the cost of the current health care system in New Mexico and the relative cost of three alternative strategies to ensure that all New Mexicans become and remain insured. To develop estimates that would help the Committee compare reform models on the same basis, we needed to develop relatively precise specifications for key components of the models. (Deborah Chollet, Su Liu, Beth Gillian, Paul Biderman, Lee Reynis, William Wiese)
PDF Version [1,000.9 K]

Santa Fe Design Week: A Pilot Study
January 1, 2007
This project serves as a pilot study whose functions are to identify major issues and concerns pertaining to Santa Fe design industries and SFDW and to inform a more rigorous data collection process in the future. To accomplish these objectives, BBER distributed information sheets to SFDW attendees to collect demographic characteristics, mailed out a survey to design businesses in Santa Fe to learn more about design business practices and conducted focus groups (FGs) to get a valuable "close look" at the experiences, opinions and perspectives of those who were involved in SFDW in a variety of capacities. (Authors: Billy Ulibarri, Myra Segal)
PDF Version [188.1 K]

Digital Media Industry for Dean Christopher Mead, College of Fine Arts of UNM
January 1, 2007
Digital media plays a central role in a number of emerging industries, including motion picture and sound recording industries, software publishing, computer systems design, advertising, and others. By all measures, the field of digital media is posed for significant growth and represents a promising avenue for economic development for New Mexico. (Author: Jeffrey Mitchell)
PDF Version [61.6 K]

Natural Resources and the Environment

The New Mexico Jobs Project: A Guide to Creating Jobs in Advanced Solar Technology
April 2, 2018
New Mexico’s advanced solar industry is a significant economic opportunity for job growth, having the potential to support an annual average of over 6,800 jobs through 2030. New Mexico can capitalize on this opportunity by bolstering the innovation ecosystem, access to capital, workforce development, value chain, and local market.
PDF Version [8.7 MB]

Population Projections

Update of the Census for Lea County: Survey of Lea County Employers
November 15, 2015
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico (UNM) surveyed businesses in Lea County as part of a project to analyze the changing economy of Lea County and to develop new economic forecasts and population and demographic projections for the area. The survey was conducted on-line using Survey Monkey. While the completed surveys, which numbered 117, were reasonably reflective of the underlying distribution of establishments by industry, some industries, like mining, transportation, and accommodations and food services, were under-represented both in terms of respondents and, particularly for mining, in terms of total industry employment. Others, like healthcare and social assistance, were over-represented. BBER explored employer overall satisfaction with the business climate and the local workforce. Over 70% of responding employers indicated considerable satisfaction with the local business climate, with only 7% indicating some dissatisfaction. As was true back in 2007, employers generally like the overall business climate but many seem to have concerns about the local work force: 21% indicated some dissatisfaction with work ethic and habits of those hired locally, while 22% expressed dissatisfaction with their education and training.
PDF Version [347.8 K]

Update of the Census for Lea County: Population Dynamics
November 15, 2015
Population growth in Lea County from 2000 to 2010 was its highest in decades. After a brief population boom-bust centered in the mid nineteen-eighties, the number of county residents remained relatively flat throughout the nineties. Beginning in 2000, the population began to climb steadily due to both natural increase and a net in-migration that corresponded with rising employment opportunities. More remarkable has been the continued population growth witnessed since 2010, especially in light of the flat growth and population decline that has simultaneously occurred throughout much of New Mexico. Lea County is currently the fastest growing in the state, and there are no indications that this distinction will soon be relinquished.
PDF Version [3.5 MB]

An Assessment of the San Miguel County Economy
August 1, 2010
The growth of San Miguel County population has lagged behind the rate for the state of NM, and this pattern is projected to continue during the coming years. Incomes in San Miguel County are about 20% lower than in other parts of the state. (Authors: Jeffrey Mitchell)
PDF Version [939.7 K]

A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the NM Counties
December 1, 2009
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the NM Counties
PDF Version [1.5 MB]

A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
March 1, 2009
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
PDF Version [2.1 MB]

Status of Nurses in New Mexico
December 1, 2007
The New Mexico Center for Nursing Excellence (NMCNE) was established in 2002 to advocate for nursing resources to meet the healthcare needs of the people of the state. As part of this mission, NMCNE commissioned the Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico to conduct two studies. The first study is an analysis of the current and projected future status of the state?s nursing labor force. The central focus of this study is the supply of qualified RNs in the state. The supply of nurses can be affected through policy whereas the demand of nurses is a result of population forces. (Author: Daren Ruiz)
PDF Version [115.3 K]

Population Studies - General

Update of the Census for Lea County: Survey of Lea County Employers
November 15, 2015
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico (UNM) surveyed businesses in Lea County as part of a project to analyze the changing economy of Lea County and to develop new economic forecasts and population and demographic projections for the area. The survey was conducted on-line using Survey Monkey. While the completed surveys, which numbered 117, were reasonably reflective of the underlying distribution of establishments by industry, some industries, like mining, transportation, and accommodations and food services, were under-represented both in terms of respondents and, particularly for mining, in terms of total industry employment. Others, like healthcare and social assistance, were over-represented. BBER explored employer overall satisfaction with the business climate and the local workforce. Over 70% of responding employers indicated considerable satisfaction with the local business climate, with only 7% indicating some dissatisfaction. As was true back in 2007, employers generally like the overall business climate but many seem to have concerns about the local work force: 21% indicated some dissatisfaction with work ethic and habits of those hired locally, while 22% expressed dissatisfaction with their education and training.
PDF Version [347.8 K]

Update of the Census for Lea County: Population Dynamics
November 15, 2015
Population growth in Lea County from 2000 to 2010 was its highest in decades. After a brief population boom-bust centered in the mid nineteen-eighties, the number of county residents remained relatively flat throughout the nineties. Beginning in 2000, the population began to climb steadily due to both natural increase and a net in-migration that corresponded with rising employment opportunities. More remarkable has been the continued population growth witnessed since 2010, especially in light of the flat growth and population decline that has simultaneously occurred throughout much of New Mexico. Lea County is currently the fastest growing in the state, and there are no indications that this distinction will soon be relinquished.
PDF Version [3.5 MB]

A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
February 1, 2011
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
PDF Version [2.1 MB]

An Assessment of the San Miguel County Economy
August 1, 2010
The growth of San Miguel County population has lagged behind the rate for the state of NM, and this pattern is projected to continue during the coming years. Incomes in San Miguel County are about 20% lower than in other parts of the state. (Authors: Jeffrey Mitchell)
PDF Version [939.7 K]

A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the NM Counties
December 1, 2009
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the NM Counties
PDF Version [1.5 MB]

A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
March 1, 2009
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the US and States
PDF Version [2.1 MB]

Status of Nurses in New Mexico
December 1, 2007
The New Mexico Center for Nursing Excellence (NMCNE) was established in 2002 to advocate for nursing resources to meet the healthcare needs of the people of the state. As part of this mission, NMCNE commissioned the Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico to conduct two studies. The first study is an analysis of the current and projected future status of the state?s nursing labor force. The central focus of this study is the supply of qualified RNs in the state. The supply of nurses can be affected through policy whereas the demand of nurses is a result of population forces. (Author: Daren Ruiz)
PDF Version [115.3 K]

The Economy of Lea County and the Larger Region: Report to Community Improvement Corporation
November 13, 2007
The Economy of Lea County and the Larger Region: Report to the Lea County Community Improvement Corporation
PDF Version [781.2 K]

Poverty

An Assessment of the San Miguel County Economy
August 1, 2010
The growth of San Miguel County population has lagged behind the rate for the state of NM, and this pattern is projected to continue during the coming years. Incomes in San Miguel County are about 20% lower than in other parts of the state. (Authors: Jeffrey Mitchell)
PDF Version [939.7 K]

Public Finance

New Mexico Taxes and Economic Development Whitepaper
May 25, 2016
The State’s tax system has a major structural problem and it relates to the gross receipts tax. New Mexico enacted an Emergency School Tax in 1935 to fund public schools with a state-level sales tax. In most states, public education is funded with local property taxes but in 1935 a statewide sales tax was chosen because it was the only tax capable of raising the revenue required. Later, New Mexico instituted a public school funding formula to deal with the inequalities in public school funding capacity across the State. Together, these actions firmly fixed the responsibility for funding public schools on the State’s General Fund.
PDF Version [95.8 K]

Economic Analysis of New Mexico's Sustainable Building Tax Credit
December 1, 2014
An analysis of New Mexico's Sustainable Building Tax Credit and its impacts on the NM economy, household expenditures, and the environment.
PDF Version [2.2 MB]

Estimating the Impacts of the Elective Single Sales Factor and Marginal CIT Rate Provisions
January 21, 2014
This report is concerned with two changes that were made to NM's corporate income tax in 2013, the phased in reduction to the marginal corporate income tax rate, which over 5-years will lower the maximum corporate rate. (Authors: Lee Reynis, Michael O'Donnell)
PDF Version [1.4 MB]

Impacts of the Debt Control Act of 2011 on the NM Economy
December 1, 2012
The Debt Control Act, negotiated by Congress and the President in August 2011, calls for at least a $2.2 trillion reduction in federal government spending through 2021. Although the details have been left resolved pending negotiations to be concluded in November, the Act does necessitate cuts of $917 billion in the first tranche and additional cuts of at least $1.2 trillion to follow. In this brief section, we estimate the potential impacts of these cuts on New Mexico?s economy, using assumptions based on the general terms of a sequestering process that is to go into effect if negotiations fail to offer alternative budgetary outcomes.
PDF Version [34.7 K]

Economic and Fiscal Impacts of the Proposed Medical Expansion in New Mexico
October 31, 2012
This brief analyzes the economic and fiscal impacts of the Medicaid Expansion in New Mexico. Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) as enacted on March 23, 2010, states were required to extend Medicaid coverage to low-income adults under 65 years old with incomes up to 133% percent of the poverty level (138% after income disregards). However, the Supreme Court held that the federal government cannot withhold current Medicaid funding should a state decide to opt out of the Medicaid Expansion. At this time, New Mexico has not decided whether to implement the Medicaid Expansion. (Authors: Lee Reynis)
PDF Version [229.6 K]

Forecasting New Mexico's Oil & Gas Revenues: The Impact of Technology Change
April 17, 2012
Recent technological improvements in horizontal drilling technologies, in particular the development of a steerable GPS-guided bit, have altered New Mexico's oil industry. As a result, patterns in oil revenues are changing and the revenue estimation process used in recent years by the New Mexico State Land Office (SLO) is not performing as reliably as it once did. The SLO has contracted the University of New Mexico's Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) to assist in identifying approaches and methods of forecasting SLO revenues from oil and gas renewable sources (i.e., bonus payments) and non-renewable sources (royalty income). (Authors: Gwendolyn Aldrich)
PDF Version [859.6 K]

Oil and Gas Revenue Forecasting: New Mexico State Land Office
July 1, 2011
The UNM Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) was requested by the State Land Office to explore alternative methodologies for estimating oil and gas renewable revenue sources (bonus payments, rents and interest earnings) as well as non-renewable sources (royalty income).
PDF Version [981.6 K]

Federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Stimulus Funding on Economy
December 1, 2010
This report examines the impacts of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) on the economy of New Mexico. ARRA has allocated $5.7 billion to New Mexico, of which over $2.6 billion had been spent through June 30. 2010. (Authors: Lee Reynis, Doleswar Bhandari)
PDF Version [633.1 K]

Options for Funding Local Library Operations (Including Collections) in New Mexico
April 1, 2010
This is a study of financing options for the operations of local libraries in New Mexico, whether these libraries are run by municipalities, counties, as a cooperative city-county effort, by non-profit organizations, by Native American tribes or by regional authorities as yet to be constituted. Our concern has been with the 93 local libraries that currently comprise the State Library system. We have not considered libraries in public schools, nor those in our colleges and universities, although surely these are important resources to local communities and not just to those who are fortunate enough to be students, staff or teachers/faculty at these institutions. The primary concern is with funding for library operations, by which we understand on-going needs: salaries and benefits for library staff, operations and maintenance of library facilities, utilities and other expenses associated with operations, and, critically, books and media. This is not to deny the importance of adequate facilities, but wonderful facilities are of little worth unless one can keep the doors open, a staff paid and unless one has product, most notably books and media, but also cultural and other programming to draw patrons of all ages. (Authors: Lee Reynis, Molly Bleecker, Sean Petranovich)
PDF Version [711.4 K]

The Transition from Incorporated Community to Municipality in the South Valley
June 1, 2008
The South Valley is a diverse area at the heart of the rural-urban interface in the Middle Rio Grande Valley. The proposition of forming a municipality in this area is full of possibility and rife with challenges. This report is an attempt to begin fleshing out the nature of what the community may face should it choose to incorporate. Part One is a historical review of incorporation in New Mexico and the Southwestern United States. Part Two is an examination of geographical, social and political issues unique to the South Valley study area. Part Three is an examination of possible partnerships that will be needed for the success of a new municipality. (Author: Joshua M. Akers)
PDF Version [174.1 K]

Comparative Analysis of Reform Options for Extending Health Care Coverage in New Mexico
July 31, 2007
The Health Coverage for New Mexicans Committee requested that Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. estimate the cost of the current health care system in New Mexico and the relative cost of three alternative strategies to ensure that all New Mexicans become and remain insured. To develop estimates that would help the Committee compare reform models on the same basis, we needed to develop relatively precise specifications for key components of the models. (Deborah Chollet, Su Liu, Beth Gillian, Paul Biderman, Lee Reynis, William Wiese)
PDF Version [1,000.9 K]

Surveys

Apartment Survey Mid-April 2017
July 20, 2017
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico conducted a survey of apartment properties in communities across the State for the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority (MFA). Unit count, vacancy and rent data for mid-April, along with the year the structure was built, were requested for apartment complexes with five or more units.
PDF Version [709.4 K]

Update of the Census for Lea County: Survey of Lea County Employers
November 15, 2015
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico (UNM) surveyed businesses in Lea County as part of a project to analyze the changing economy of Lea County and to develop new economic forecasts and population and demographic projections for the area. The survey was conducted on-line using Survey Monkey. While the completed surveys, which numbered 117, were reasonably reflective of the underlying distribution of establishments by industry, some industries, like mining, transportation, and accommodations and food services, were under-represented both in terms of respondents and, particularly for mining, in terms of total industry employment. Others, like healthcare and social assistance, were over-represented. BBER explored employer overall satisfaction with the business climate and the local workforce. Over 70% of responding employers indicated considerable satisfaction with the local business climate, with only 7% indicating some dissatisfaction. As was true back in 2007, employers generally like the overall business climate but many seem to have concerns about the local work force: 21% indicated some dissatisfaction with work ethic and habits of those hired locally, while 22% expressed dissatisfaction with their education and training.
PDF Version [347.8 K]

Broadband Subscription and Internet Use in New Mexico
June 1, 2013
The New Mexico Department of Information Technology?s (DoIT) Broadband Program, funded by the Broadband Technology Opportunity Program (BTOP), serves as a coordinating agency of statewide initiatives to broaden the availability and promote adoption of high- speed internet in New Mexico. As part of this effort, DoIT has contracted UNM?s Bureau of Business & Economic Research (BBER) to provide an analysis of patterns and barriers to broadband adoption in New Mexico. This report summarizes the results of this analysis. The report draws upon a survey of 1,000 households across New Mexico. The survey, conducted in December 2012, queried home internet access and internet technologies; barriers to home access; patterns of internet use both in the home and outside the home; digital literacy and access to resources to enhance digital literacy. The survey also collected a wide range of socioeconomic and demographic information, including geographical location, from the survey participants.
PDF Version [0 bytes]

NM Mortgage Finance Authority Apartment Survey, 2013
May 15, 2013
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico conducted a survey of apartment properties in communities across the State for the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority (MFA). The goal was to provide MFA with current market information to enhance the organization?s databases. This is part of a continuing BBER effort on behalf of MFA and was the fifth survey in as many years. (Author: Suzan Reagan)
PDF Version [0 bytes]

NM Mortgage Finance Authority Apartment Survey, 2012
May 15, 2012
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico conducted a survey of apartment properties in communities across the State for the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority (MFA). The goal was to provide MFA with current market information to enhance the organization?s databases. This is part of a continuing BBER effort on behalf of MFA and was the fifth survey in as many years. (Author: Suzan Reagan)
PDF Version [535.6 K]

NM Mortgage Finance Authority Apartment Survey, 2011
August 1, 2011
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico conducted a survey of apartment properties in communities across the State for the New Mexico Mortgage Finance Authority (MFA). The goal was to provide MFA with current market information to enhance the organization?s databases. This is part of a continuing BBER effort on behalf of MFA and was the fifth survey in as many years. (Author: Suzan Reagan)
PDF Version [171.6 K]

Recent Population Dynamics of New Mexico Nurses
July 1, 2008
This study analyzes recent population dynamics of New Mexico nurses also with the license database from NMBON. NMCNE wants to project future nursing shortages and advocate for a commensurate increase in nursing education resources. In order to do so, a sound understanding of the changing nature of the nursing population is needed. This study explores nursing population dynamics in two sections: inflow and outflow. (Author: Daren Ruiz)
PDF Version [147.6 K]

Status of Nurses in New Mexico
December 1, 2007
The New Mexico Center for Nursing Excellence (NMCNE) was established in 2002 to advocate for nursing resources to meet the healthcare needs of the people of the state. As part of this mission, NMCNE commissioned the Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) at the University of New Mexico to conduct two studies. The first study is an analysis of the current and projected future status of the state?s nursing labor force. The central focus of this study is the supply of qualified RNs in the state. The supply of nurses can be affected through policy whereas the demand of nurses is a result of population forces. (Author: Daren Ruiz)
PDF Version [115.3 K]

Population, Housing, and Education in Lea County: Community Improvement Corporation Report
November 13, 2007
Population, Housing, and Education in Lea County: Report to the Lea County Community Improvement Corporation
PDF Version [2.3 MB]

Employer Survey: A Report to the Lea County Community Improvement Corporation (Lea Economy)
November 13, 2007
Survey of Lea County Employers (in connection with the report on The Economy of Lea County and the Larger Region) a Report to the Lea County Community Improvement Corporation
PDF Version [304.5 K]

Santa Fe Design Week: A Pilot Study
January 1, 2007
This project serves as a pilot study whose functions are to identify major issues and concerns pertaining to Santa Fe design industries and SFDW and to inform a more rigorous data collection process in the future. To accomplish these objectives, BBER distributed information sheets to SFDW attendees to collect demographic characteristics, mailed out a survey to design businesses in Santa Fe to learn more about design business practices and conducted focus groups (FGs) to get a valuable "close look" at the experiences, opinions and perspectives of those who were involved in SFDW in a variety of capacities. (Authors: Billy Ulibarri, Myra Segal)
PDF Version [188.1 K]

Taxes

Economic and Fiscal Impacts of the Medicaid Expansion in NM Since Implementation in 2014
May 25, 2016
This brief updates a previous analysis performed by UNM BBER on the likely impacts of Medicaid Expansion in New Mexico. Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) as enacted on March 23, 2010, states were required to extend Medicaid coverage to low-income adults under 65 years old with incomes up to 133% percent of the poverty level (138% after income disregards). However, the Supreme Court held that the federal government cannot withhold current Medicaid funding should a state decide to opt out of the Medicaid Expansion. When the previous report was written, New Mexico had not decided whether to implement the Medicaid Expansion. Subsequently, in January 2013, Governor Susana Martinez announced her decision to have New Mexico participate in the expansion. This brief examines: 1. The additional flow of federal Medicaid dollars to the State of New Mexico since January 2014 as more and more eligible adults signed up to participate in the Medicaid Expansion and provides projections for the program through State Fiscal Year 2021. The projections through FY 2020 are based on enrollment and cost projections by the NM Health and Human Services Department (HSD) in December 2015. Details are in many cases informed by HSD projections that were made in conjunction with their September submission for the 2017 Budget cycle. 2. Related to the ACA and the Medicaid Expansion, changes in federal and state programs designed to cover uncompensated care. 3. The emerging economic data that reflect the impacts of the Medicaid Expansion to date. 4. An analysis of the economic impacts on New Mexico of the Medicaid Expansion (including new job creation) since implementation in 2014 and as may be expected between now and 2021. 5. Actual and anticipated impacts of the Medicaid Expansion on the State General Fund.
PDF Version [657.8 K]

Development of Modeling Tool to be Used in Evaluating Alternatives to the Current Gross Receipt
January 9, 2015
The Bureau of Business and Economic Research was asked to analyze the structure of the NM economy to develop estimates of commercial transactions in the state as well as other information critical to a full assessment of tax options by the Revenue Stabilization and Tax Policy Committee. BBER had determined that the IMPLAN model and proprietary databases could provide an appropriate tool for a model of the structure of the New Mexico economy that would yield information critical to evaluating alternatives to the current gross receipts tax. The first phase of the research involved validating the I MPLAN model and IMPLAN databases on the structure of NM economy in 2012. We then combined the IMPLAN data with other data in an effort to build a model for estimating the gross receipts tax base statewide. Finally, we put the model to the test by examining the revenue impacts of the Sharer-Taylor 2013 legislation to replace the Gross Receipts, Income and other taxes with a broad -based tax on transactions
PDF Version [222.8 K]

Economic Analysis of New Mexico's Sustainable Building Tax Credit
December 1, 2014
An analysis of New Mexico's Sustainable Building Tax Credit and its impacts on the NM economy, household expenditures, and the environment.
PDF Version [2.2 MB]

Estimating the Impacts of the Elective Single Sales Factor and Marginal CIT Rate Provisions
January 21, 2014
This report is concerned with two changes that were made to NM's corporate income tax in 2013, the phased in reduction to the marginal corporate income tax rate, which over 5-years will lower the maximum corporate rate. (Authors: Lee Reynis, Michael O'Donnell)
PDF Version [1.4 MB]

Economic Impacts of Albuquerque Airport System on the New Mexico Economy
August 1, 2013
The purpose of this study is to estimate the economic impact of Albuquerque International Sunport and Double Eagle II airports in the state of New Mexico. It measures impacts of these airports in terms of jobs, income, economic output and taxes. (Author: Doleswar Bhandari, Ph.D)
PDF Version [3.9 MB]

Impacts of the Debt Control Act of 2011 on the NM Economy
December 1, 2012
The Debt Control Act, negotiated by Congress and the President in August 2011, calls for at least a $2.2 trillion reduction in federal government spending through 2021. Although the details have been left resolved pending negotiations to be concluded in November, the Act does necessitate cuts of $917 billion in the first tranche and additional cuts of at least $1.2 trillion to follow. In this brief section, we estimate the potential impacts of these cuts on New Mexico?s economy, using assumptions based on the general terms of a sequestering process that is to go into effect if negotiations fail to offer alternative budgetary outcomes.
PDF Version [34.7 K]

Forecasting New Mexico's Oil & Gas Revenues: The Impact of Technology Change
April 17, 2012
Recent technological improvements in horizontal drilling technologies, in particular the development of a steerable GPS-guided bit, have altered New Mexico's oil industry. As a result, patterns in oil revenues are changing and the revenue estimation process used in recent years by the New Mexico State Land Office (SLO) is not performing as reliably as it once did. The SLO has contracted the University of New Mexico's Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) to assist in identifying approaches and methods of forecasting SLO revenues from oil and gas renewable sources (i.e., bonus payments) and non-renewable sources (royalty income). (Authors: Gwendolyn Aldrich)
PDF Version [859.6 K]

Oil and Gas Revenue Forecasting: New Mexico State Land Office
July 1, 2011
The UNM Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) was requested by the State Land Office to explore alternative methodologies for estimating oil and gas renewable revenue sources (bonus payments, rents and interest earnings) as well as non-renewable sources (royalty income).
PDF Version [981.6 K]

South Valley Incorporation Feasibility
October 1, 2008
The area proposed for South Valley incorporation is a vast area on the City of Albuquerque's southwestern flank with a population conservatively estimated to be just over 50,000 in 2007.1 While the South Valley incorporation area accounts for just under half (45%) of the population in unincorporated Bernalillo County and was almost 8% of the county's total population in 2000, as estimated by the Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER), the area is under served in terms of private sector economic activity. In 2006, average monthly private wage and salary employment in the South Valley area amounted to 7,700, or 2.9%, of the average for all of Bernalillo County. Determining the financial feasibility of a South Valley municipality requires developing estimates of the revenues that might be raised, and this in turn requires a careful reading of New Mexico statutes to see what the City may be entitled to and what authority it has under State law, as well as estimating the tax bases and the levels of activity against which fees and charges for services will be assessed. Of course, it is also critical to determine how much it will cost to provide various municipal services to the South Valley. In this exercise, it is useful to look at other municipalities, the revenues they raise, the amounts spent on providing services -- as well as taking a very careful look at service provision to the South Valley by Bernalillo County and any associated revenues.
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The Transition from Incorporated Community to Municipality in the South Valley
June 1, 2008
The South Valley is a diverse area at the heart of the rural-urban interface in the Middle Rio Grande Valley. The proposition of forming a municipality in this area is full of possibility and rife with challenges. This report is an attempt to begin fleshing out the nature of what the community may face should it choose to incorporate. Part One is a historical review of incorporation in New Mexico and the Southwestern United States. Part Two is an examination of geographical, social and political issues unique to the South Valley study area. Part Three is an examination of possible partnerships that will be needed for the success of a new municipality. (Author: Joshua M. Akers)
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Technology

The New Mexico Jobs Project: A Guide to Creating Jobs in Advanced Solar Technology
April 2, 2018
New Mexico’s advanced solar industry is a significant economic opportunity for job growth, having the potential to support an annual average of over 6,800 jobs through 2030. New Mexico can capitalize on this opportunity by bolstering the innovation ecosystem, access to capital, workforce development, value chain, and local market.
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STC.UNM: The Impact of Start-UP Companies on the New Mexico Economy
June 1, 2014
The STC.UNM is the technology transfer and economic development organizatin of UNM. STC.UNM commissioned BBER to conduct a study of the economic impact of start-up companies using STC tech on the NM economy. (Author: Daren Ruiz)
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Broadband Subscription and Internet Use in New Mexico
June 1, 2013
The New Mexico Department of Information Technology?s (DoIT) Broadband Program, funded by the Broadband Technology Opportunity Program (BTOP), serves as a coordinating agency of statewide initiatives to broaden the availability and promote adoption of high- speed internet in New Mexico. As part of this effort, DoIT has contracted UNM?s Bureau of Business & Economic Research (BBER) to provide an analysis of patterns and barriers to broadband adoption in New Mexico. This report summarizes the results of this analysis. The report draws upon a survey of 1,000 households across New Mexico. The survey, conducted in December 2012, queried home internet access and internet technologies; barriers to home access; patterns of internet use both in the home and outside the home; digital literacy and access to resources to enhance digital literacy. The survey also collected a wide range of socioeconomic and demographic information, including geographical location, from the survey participants.
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UNM's Science and Technology Corporation: The Impact of Start-up Companies
January 1, 2011
The Science and Technology Corporation (STC) asked the Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) to conduct a study of the economic impact of start-up companies using STC technologies on the economy of New Mexico. BBER conducted a similar analysis in 2004 and is available on the STC website (http://stc.unm.edu/about/metrics.php). This analysis updates the 2004 study and emphasizes the impact of high-tech start-up companies that have had a relationship with STC from 2004 to the present. Of the 16 companies included in the survey, 12 are headquartered in New Mexico. Nevertheless, all companies conduct operations within New Mexico. Table 1 shows the relevant companies along with start-up date and a short company description (Authors: Michael O'Donnell)
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Transportation

Economic Impacts of Albuquerque Airport System on the New Mexico Economy
August 1, 2013
The purpose of this study is to estimate the economic impact of Albuquerque International Sunport and Double Eagle II airports in the state of New Mexico. It measures impacts of these airports in terms of jobs, income, economic output and taxes. (Author: Doleswar Bhandari, Ph.D)
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Commuter Rail Transit Price Elasticity of Demand: An Assessment for the New Mexico Rail Runner
September 12, 2011
The New Mexico Rail Runner (NMRX) has been in operation since July 17, 2006. Current annual operating expenses for NMRX are approximately $24 million. Although the federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) program provided NMRX with $6.8 million in annual funding in FY10, these Funds were reduced by $1.2 million in FY12. CMAQ restrictions will phase eliminate these funds by FY13. Due to the need to attain a balanced budget, the Rio Metro Regional Transit District (RMRTD) is exploring a variety of options for raising revenues and reducing operating expenses, including advertising, exploring other state and federal funding sources, schedule changes, fare increases, and using buses for less popular routes. The Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) was asked to assess the potential effects of an increase in fares?and in particular the impact of fare increases on ridership ? by conducting a literature review and examining NMRX?s peer transit systems.
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Travel & Tourism

Zuni MainStreet: Community Economic Assessment
June 1, 2014
Located in the Northwestern region of New Mexico, the Zuni Pueblo is located approximately 150 miles west of Albuquerque and roughly 35 miles south of Gallup. The Reservation covers over 418,000 acres and lies on the western border of New Mexico and the eastern border of Arizona. The predominately Native American community is comprised primarily of people who identify as belonging to the Zuni (A:shiwi) tribe. The Zuni people have inhabited the Southwest for thousands of years and have traditions deeply rooted in agriculture, art, and jewelry making. Due to its relative geographic isolation, the Zuni tribe has maintained a very unique language that is still spoken today. (Authors: Dr. Lee Reynis, Gillian Joyce, Ashley Hooper, Mary Louise Gucik, Daren Ruiz)

Wages

Analysis of UNM's Faculty Worklife Survey
February 13, 2015
In the fall of 2013, UNM implemented a Faculty Worklife Survey at UNM Main Campus, developed by Academic Leader ship Fellow Melissa Bokovoy and Associate Provost for Faculty Development Virginia Scharff, based on a similar survey designed by the University of Wisconsin and implemented there and at a number of other universities across the country. The UNM survey responses were compiled and the results made available on a limited basis last year. Several months after the survey was completed, UNM Bureau of Business and Economic Research was asked to analyze the survey results. Having had a leadership role in a Legislative Task Force on Work - Life Balance, BBER was enthusiastic about this assignment. The survey was well designed and comprehensive in its exploration of issues.
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A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the NM Counties
December 1, 2009
A Chart and Map Book of Population and Selected Economic Indicators for the NM Counties
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The Impacts of the $9.50 Living Wage on the Economy of the City of Santa Fe, Part II
November 1, 2007
Post-implementation of the $9.50 Living Wage Analysis: The Impacts of the $9.50 Living Wage on the Economy of the City of Santa Fe, Part II
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Full Report - Impacts of the $9.50 Living Wage on the Economy of Santa Fe, Part I
August 1, 2007
Post-implementation of the $9.50 Living Wage Analysis: Full Report - Impacts of the $9.50 Living Wage on the Economy of Santa Fe, Part I
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Executive Summary - Impacts of the $9.50 Living Wage on the Economy of Santa Fe, Part I
August 1, 2007
Post-implementation of the $9.50 Living Wage Analysis: Executive Summary - Impacts of the $9.50 Living Wage on the Economy of Santa Fe, Part I
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Earnings and Employment: The Effects of the Living Wage Ordinance in Santa Fe, New Mexico
August 1, 2006
Post-implementation of the $8.50 Living Wage Analysis: Earnings and Employment: The Effects of the Living Wage Ordinance in Santa Fe, New Mexico
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Measuring the Employment Impacts of the Living Wage Ordinance in Santa Fe, NM
June 1, 2006
Post-implementation of the $8.50 Living Wage Analysis: Measuring the Employment Impacts of the Living Wage Ordinance in Santa Fe, New Mexico
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Prelim Analysis: Impacts on the $8.50 Minimum Wage on Santa Fe Businesses, Workers and Economy
December 27, 2005
Preliminary Analysis: Impacts on the $8.50 Minimum Wage on Santa Fe Businesses, Workers and the Santa Fe Economy
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Santa Fe Living Wage Baseline Study (Pre-implementation of the $8.50 Living Wage Baseline Data)
March 1, 2004
Santa Fe Living Wage Baseline Study (Pre-implementation of the $8.50 Living Wage Baseline Data)
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Water Studies

Estimated Economic Impacts of the Buckman Direct Diversion Project
January 30, 2009
The Buckman Direct Diversion (BDD) Project will provide an additional source of water supply for the Santa Fe area. It includes a diversion structure on the Rio Grande, pumping stations, pipelines and a new water treatment plant. The City of Santa Fe and Santa Fe County, with Las Campanas as a limited partner, are building the BDD to access San Juan-Chama Project water contracted to the City and the County and water associated with native Rio Grande water rights. The BDD water treatment plant will prepare the City and County water for use by residents and businesses. The design-build contractor is a joint venture between CH2M Hill and Western Summit Constructors. Construction began in September 2008 and will continue until the project is operational, expected before the summer in 2011. The project budget for the fiscal years commencing July 1, 2008, through project construction completion is $216 million. Prior to FY 08, professional services for planning, conceptual and preliminary design, compliance with federal environmental law, acquisition of state and federal permits, and competitive procurement of the design and build contractor cost an additional $13 million. (Authors: Lee Reynis, Dolewsar Bhandari, Andrew Webb)
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