Publications

Economic Impact Analysis

Economic and Fiscal Impacts of the Medicaid Expansion in NM Since Implementation in 2014
May 25, 2016
This brief updates a previous analysis performed by UNM BBER on the likely impacts of Medicaid Expansion in New Mexico. Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) as enacted on March 23, 2010, states were required to extend Medicaid coverage to low-income adults under 65 years old with incomes up to 133% percent of the poverty level (138% after income disregards). However, the Supreme Court held that the federal government cannot withhold current Medicaid funding should a state decide to opt out of the Medicaid Expansion. When the previous report was written, New Mexico had not decided whether to implement the Medicaid Expansion. Subsequently, in January 2013, Governor Susana Martinez announced her decision to have New Mexico participate in the expansion. This brief examines: 1. The additional flow of federal Medicaid dollars to the State of New Mexico since January 2014 as more and more eligible adults signed up to participate in the Medicaid Expansion and provides projections for the program through State Fiscal Year 2021. The projections through FY 2020 are based on enrollment and cost projections by the NM Health and Human Services Department (HSD) in December 2015. Details are in many cases informed by HSD projections that were made in conjunction with their September submission for the 2017 Budget cycle. 2. Related to the ACA and the Medicaid Expansion, changes in federal and state programs designed to cover uncompensated care. 3. The emerging economic data that reflect the impacts of the Medicaid Expansion to date. 4. An analysis of the economic impacts on New Mexico of the Medicaid Expansion (including new job creation) since implementation in 2014 and as may be expected between now and 2021. 5. Actual and anticipated impacts of the Medicaid Expansion on the State General Fund.
PDF Version [657.8 K]

Economic Impacts of the UNM Health Sciences Center on the New Mexico Economy
December 1, 2014
The University of New Mexico Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) was commissioned by the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center (UNM HSC) to estimate its economic impact on the State of New Mexico for the fiscal year 2013. This report describes the impacts, in terms of jobs, income, economic output and taxes, of UNM HSC on the State economy.
PDF Version [1.8 MB]

Economic Analysis of New Mexico's Sustainable Building Tax Credit
December 1, 2014
An analysis of New Mexico's Sustainable Building Tax Credit and its impacts on the NM economy, household expenditures, and the environment.
PDF Version [2.2 MB]

Building on the Past, Facing the Future: Renewing the Creative Economy of New Mexico
August 1, 2014
The arts and cultural industries are among the main drivers of New Mexico’s economy. Arts and culture in New Mexico enjoy a national reputation far beyond the state’s size or economic standing. With the proper level of support and evolution, the arts and cultural industries could be leveraged to help power the New Mexico economy as it emerges from the economic recession. To appreciate the importance of arts and culture to New Mexico’s economy, consider that these industries are the primary source of employment for 43,031 New Mexicans –roughly equal to the state’s construction industry and 50% larger than the manufacturing industry. The arts and cultural industries account for about 1 of every 18 jobs in the state (5.5%). These industries pay $1.37 billion in wages and salaries, roughly equal to the total paid by the state’s mining industry, and more than the total paid by hotels and restaurants. These figures are based on a narrow definition of the A&C industries. If we include persons employed cultural tourism, arts and cultural education and industries linked to the unique culture and heritage of the state (e.g. crafts, salsa, and adobe), the arts and cultural industries employ 76,780 persons - equal to about one in ten jobs (9.8%) in the state. That is more than the construction and manufacturing industries combined. Arts and cultural industries generate $137.1 million in revenues for state and local governments in New Mexico. Approximately two-thirds of the total is received by the state government as gross receipts taxes, income taxes paid by cultural workers, federal transfers and various fees and private grants. The total cost of cultural services to public agencies in New Mexico is $168.0 million. Most of these costs are borne by local (and especially municipal) governments, with the largest share of the funds allocated to libraries as well as museums and cultural services and events. These figures do not include revenues or spending on public education.
PDF Version [1.9 MB]

STC.UNM: The Impact of Start-UP Companies on the New Mexico Economy
June 1, 2014
The STC.UNM is the technology transfer and economic development organizatin of UNM. STC.UNM commissioned BBER to conduct a study of the economic impact of start-up companies using STC tech on the NM economy. (Author: Daren Ruiz)
PDF Version [207.2 K]

Economic Impacts of Albuquerque Airport System on the New Mexico Economy
August 1, 2013
The purpose of this study is to estimate the economic impact of Albuquerque International Sunport and Double Eagle II airports in the state of New Mexico. It measures impacts of these airports in terms of jobs, income, economic output and taxes. (Author: Doleswar Bhandari, Ph.D)
PDF Version [3.9 MB]

Economic Impact of the School for Advanced Research on the Economies of Santa Fe County and NM
January 1, 2013
The University of New Mexico Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) was commissioned by the School for Advanced Research (SAR) to estimate the economic impact of SAR on the economies of Santa Fe County and the State of New Mexico for the fiscal year 2011-2012 (FY12).
PDF Version [692.5 K]

Impacts of the Debt Control Act of 2011 on the NM Economy
December 1, 2012
The Debt Control Act, negotiated by Congress and the President in August 2011, calls for at least a $2.2 trillion reduction in federal government spending through 2021. Although the details have been left resolved pending negotiations to be concluded in November, the Act does necessitate cuts of $917 billion in the first tranche and additional cuts of at least $1.2 trillion to follow. In this brief section, we estimate the potential impacts of these cuts on New Mexico?s economy, using assumptions based on the general terms of a sequestering process that is to go into effect if negotiations fail to offer alternative budgetary outcomes.
PDF Version [34.7 K]

Economic and Fiscal Impacts of the Proposed Medical Expansion in New Mexico
October 31, 2012
This brief analyzes the economic and fiscal impacts of the Medicaid Expansion in New Mexico. Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) as enacted on March 23, 2010, states were required to extend Medicaid coverage to low-income adults under 65 years old with incomes up to 133% percent of the poverty level (138% after income disregards). However, the Supreme Court held that the federal government cannot withhold current Medicaid funding should a state decide to opt out of the Medicaid Expansion. At this time, New Mexico has not decided whether to implement the Medicaid Expansion. (Authors: Lee Reynis)
PDF Version [229.6 K]

The Economic Impact of Dona Ana Community College in Dona Ana County in FY11
May 1, 2012
Dona Ana Community College (DACC) commissioned University of New Mexico?s Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) to analyze the economic impact of its operation on the Dona Ana County economy for fiscal year (FY) 2011. BBER estimated conventional economic impacts of DACC using IMPLAN, an economic impact analysis model. The economic impacts of DACC arise from several sources including college operation and capital spending, out-of-county student spending and the additional earnings of DACC graduates and noncredit students who earn higher wages and salaries because of their education and who remain in the county after completion of their degree, certificate and training. (Doleswar Bhandari, Ph.D.)
PDF Version [434.9 K]

Air Force Research Laboratory Kirtland AFB, NM; FY09 Economic Impact Assessment
May 1, 2012
The University of New Mexico's Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) was commissioned by the New Mexico Institute of Mining and technology, an Air Force Research Laboratory partnership intermediary, to estimate the economic impact of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) at Kirtland Air Force Base (Kirtland AFB) on the economy of New Mexico for Federal Fiscal Year 2009 (FY09). This analysis covers the economic impact of the Directed Energy Directorate (RD) and the Space Vehicles Directorate (RV), hereafter referred to as AFRL, and which constitute the Phillips Research Site (PRS) at Kirtland in Albuquerque, NM. (Authors: Doleswar Bhandari, Jessica Bloom)
PDF Version [273.1 K]

The Economic Impact of SV Economic Development Center on the Bernalillo County Economy
November 1, 2011
The University of New Mexico?s Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) was commissioned by the Rio Grande Community Development Corporation (RGCDC) to estimate the economic impact of businesses affiliated with the South Valley Economic Development Center (SVEDC) on the Bernalillo County economy for Calendar Year 2010. SVEDC-affiliated businesses are defined as businesses that are currently using or have formerly used SVEDC resources. SVEDC current tenants or service recipients: 77 SVEDC graduates: 32 Total beneficiaries: 109 Total business employment impact: 298 jobs Total wages and salary impact: $3.93 million Total business activity impact: $8.97 million (Authors: Doleswar Bhandari)
PDF Version [161.6 K]

Economic Impact of Los Alamos National Laboratory on Northern New Mexico and the State
March 1, 2011
LANL injected more than $1.4 billion directly into the northern New Mexico economy during FY 2009. These injections provided more than 11,200 direct jobs, nearly $1.1 billion labor income and $1.4 billion economic output to the region. LANL?s expenditures also indirectly supported approximately 9,300 jobs, more than $317 million in labor income and $932 million economic output in this region (Table 3.1). The total economic impact of LANL to the region is approximately 20,531 in employment, $1.4 billion in labor income, and $2.3 billion in economic output. In addition, a total of 3,050 LANL retirees with $140 million in pension benefits are estimated to have supported an additional 821 jobs with $26 million in labor income (Table 4.1). Northern New Mexico consists of the seven counties of Los Alamos, Santa Fe, Rio Arriba, Sandoval, Taos, San Miguel and Mora. (Author: Dolewsar Bhandari, PhD)
PDF Version [204.5 K]

The Economic Impact of the University of New Mexico on the State of New Mexico (February 2011)
February 1, 2011
This study focuses on the economic impacts resulting from UNM spending and employment. The computed impacts show how the dollars that flow to UNM from outside of New Mexico (out-of-state) sources support direct spending on salaries, benefits, and goods and services. The impacts also show how spending creates additional, derivative, economic activity in the state of New Mexico.1 For instance, UNM’s expenditures on goods and services create indirect effects as the firms supplying UNM purchase supplies from other firms and employ people to produce their products. Part of salaries of UNM employees and UNM vendors are then spent in the community, creating induced effects, causing further demand for goods and services and resulting in more jobs and additional income. The indirect and induced effects, combined with the direct contribution of UNM funded by out-of-state sources, result in the total economic impact of the University of New Mexico on the state of New Mexico. However, it is important to note that this is not the maximum impact from UNM. Impacts of other factors such as encouraging technology development and contributing to an educated workforce are likely to be substantial even if they are less easily quantified.
PDF Version [268.4 K]

UNM's Science and Technology Corporation: The Impact of Start-up Companies
January 1, 2011
The Science and Technology Corporation (STC) asked the Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER) to conduct a study of the economic impact of start-up companies using STC technologies on the economy of New Mexico. BBER conducted a similar analysis in 2004 and is available on the STC website (http://stc.unm.edu/about/metrics.php). This analysis updates the 2004 study and emphasizes the impact of high-tech start-up companies that have had a relationship with STC from 2004 to the present. Of the 16 companies included in the survey, 12 are headquartered in New Mexico. Nevertheless, all companies conduct operations within New Mexico. Table 1 shows the relevant companies along with start-up date and a short company description (Authors: Michael O'Donnell)
PDF Version [224.1 K]

Federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Stimulus Funding on Economy
December 1, 2010
This report examines the impacts of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) on the economy of New Mexico. ARRA has allocated $5.7 billion to New Mexico, of which over $2.6 billion had been spent through June 30. 2010. (Authors: Lee Reynis, Doleswar Bhandari)
PDF Version [633.1 K]

New Mexico Business Current Economic Report: Overview of Economic Impact Analysis
October 1, 2010
New Mexico Business Current Economic Report: Overview of Economic Impact Analysis
PDF Version [75.2 K]

Econ Impacts of the Anticipated Non-Accreditation of Bernalillo Co Levees - Part 2: Development
September 1, 2010
Economic Impacts of the Anticipated Non-Accreditation of Bernalillo County Levees - Part 2: Development Impacts (Authors: Daren Ruiz, Molly Bleecker)
PDF Version [2.4 MB]

Econ Impacts of the Anticipated Non-Accreditation of Bernalillo Co Levees - Part 1: Flood Ins
September 1, 2010
Economic Impacts of the Anticipated Non-Accreditation of Bernalillo County Levees - Part 1: Estimated Cost of Increased Flood Insurance (Authors: Daren Ruiz, Molly Bleecker)
PDF Version [762.4 K]

Estimated Economic Impacts of the Buckman Direct Diversion Project
January 30, 2009
The Buckman Direct Diversion (BDD) Project will provide an additional source of water supply for the Santa Fe area. It includes a diversion structure on the Rio Grande, pumping stations, pipelines and a new water treatment plant. The City of Santa Fe and Santa Fe County, with Las Campanas as a limited partner, are building the BDD to access San Juan-Chama Project water contracted to the City and the County and water associated with native Rio Grande water rights. The BDD water treatment plant will prepare the City and County water for use by residents and businesses. The design-build contractor is a joint venture between CH2M Hill and Western Summit Constructors. Construction began in September 2008 and will continue until the project is operational, expected before the summer in 2011. The project budget for the fiscal years commencing July 1, 2008, through project construction completion is $216 million. Prior to FY 08, professional services for planning, conceptual and preliminary design, compliance with federal environmental law, acquisition of state and federal permits, and competitive procurement of the design and build contractor cost an additional $13 million. (Authors: Lee Reynis, Dolewsar Bhandari, Andrew Webb)
PDF Version [314.3 K]

UNM Bureau of Business and Economic Research • Onate Hall at The University of New Mexico
303 Girard Blvd. NE, Suite 116; Albuquerque, NM 87106 • 505.277.2216 Main • 505.277.6626 Data Bank