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 June 20th 2019 - Written by: Suzan Reagan

State Data Center Annual Conference Notes 2019

Last week I attended the National State Data Center Conference held in Charlotte, North Carolina. The Census Bureau had a packed schedule with lots of information on the upcoming 2020 Decennial Census. Here are highlights that you might find interesting. First we had an update on the addition of the Citizen Question. As you might expect, there is a lot of interest in how this might impact response rates. The Census Bureau will be doing a 2019 Census Test survey to determine this. The survey started this June and is planned to run through August with July 1, 2019 as the Census day. The 2019 Census Test will be conducted nationwide, surveying approximately 480,000 housing unit addresses with forms with the question and without. Information on this test can be found at (https://www.census.gov/newsroom/press-releases/2019/2019-test-begins.html). While I’m not personally involved with the Redistricting program, I’d like to highlight that James Whitehorne, the… View Full Post


 September 20th 2016 - Written by: Jeff Mitchell

Income Gains in New Mexico Lag the Nation

On September 16, the Census Bureau released results of its most recent Current Population Survey (CPS) Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC). The report received a great deal of attention[1] as it included evidence that real median household incomes increased 5.2% between 2014 and 2015. This was the first annual increase since 2007 and clearest evidence that the economic recovery has begun to benefit more than those at that the top of the income pyramid. How did New Mexico do? In New Mexico, median household income grew by 1.2%, from $44,837 to $45,382. Although an improvement in its own right, the state’s position relative to the rest of the country slipped. In 2014, median household income in the state was 83.5% of the national median, ranking 43rd of the 50 states. In 2015, incomes were 81.4% of the national median, 45th among all states. Poverty data followed a similar pattern…. View Full Post

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 March 14th 2016 - Written by: Gwen Aldrich

The value of metro nature

A paper published last year by Wolf et al.[1] attempts to quantify the economic value associated with various psychosocial, cognitive, and physical health and well-being benefits derived from US metro nature areas. Metro nature is a broadly-defined term that includes open spaces, riparian areas, parks, community gardens, streetscapes, green rooftops, and other such areas. The authors focus on 6 out of 15 such benefits documented in the peer-reviewed literature – birth weight, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), secondary school performance, crime, cardiovascular disease, and Alzheimer’s disease – and estimate that the annual economic value (in the form of lower and avoided costs and higher income) associated with these six health and well-being benefits totals between $2.7 and $6.8 billion (2012 $). The health and well-being benefits are most often associated with direct and active human interaction with metro nature. As an example, interactions with nature and green areas have been… View Full Post

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